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Re: yucatan again



> Date:          Tue, 23 Aug 1994 13:58:27 -0400
> Reply-to:      wwrtaylo@antelope.wcc.edu
> From:          Roger Taylor <wwrtaylo@antelope.wcc.edu>
> To:            Multiple recipients of list <dinosaur@lepomis.psych.upenn.edu>
> Subject:       Re: yucatan again

> 
> On Tue, 23 Aug 1994, Neil Clark wrote:
> 
> > I've worked out what it is and where it is....but I can't work out the
> > orientation.  Has anyone else looked at the Endeavour image of the
> > Yucatan??  
> > 
> > Neil Clark
> > gxha14@udcf.gla.ac.uk
> 
>       Is this image available anywhere on the Internet?  I haven't
> seen it.
> 
> Roger Taylor, Jr.
> Western Wyoming College
> 
> 

The following was posted on Aug. 1:

> Date:          Mon, 1 Aug 1994 09:23:56 -0400
> Reply-to:      binder@zk3.dec.com
> From:          binder@zk3.dec.com (etsi capularis ego vita fruar)
> To:            Multiple recipients of list <dinosaur@lepomis.psych.upenn.edu>
> Subject:       Space shuttle image of Chicxulub crater

> ***Excerpted*** from a post to usenet-space-news@arc.nasa.gov:
> 
> Sevral new images from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band
> Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) experiment that flew on
> the space shuttle Endeavour in April 1994 have been released.
> 
> The images include:
> 
>      P-44423:  The site of an impact crater at Chicxulub on the
>      Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico thought to be caused by an
>      asteroid or comet 65 million years ago that killed off the
>      dinosaurs;
> 
> World Wide Web/Mosaic:
> 
>      http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/
> 
>      From the JPL home page, select "News flash" and then
>      the item for new SIR-C/X-SAR images.  The images displayed
>      on the menu pages are a lower-resolution browse version.
>     You may also click on an item to transfer full-resolution
>      (up to 6.6-megabyte) versions.
> 
> Anonymous file transfer protocol (ftp):
> 
>      jplinfo.jpl.nasa.gov
> 
>      Browse versions are in the `news' directory as filenames
>      SC-*.GIF.  Full-resolution versions are in the `sircxsar/images'
>      directory as P*.JPG (under their file numbers).
> 
> 
> Dialup modem:
> 
>      +1 (818) 354-1333
> 
>      Browse versions are in the `news' directory as filenames
>      SC-*.GIF.  Full-resolution versions are in the `sircxsar'
>      directory as P*.JPG (under their file numbers).
> 
> 
> Hardcopy prints:
> 
>      Prints may be ordered using the P- file number from the vendor:
> 
>      Newell Color Lab
>      221 N. Westmoreland Avenue
>      Los Angeles, CA 90064
>      USA
> 
> ___________________________________________________________
> PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE
> JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
> CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
> NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
> PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
> 
> PHOTO CAPTION                                  July 28, 1994
> 
>                                                      P-44423                  
>                                  Chicxulub
> 
> This is a radar image of the southwest portion of  the buried
> Chicxulub impact crater in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.  The radar
> image was acquired on orbit 81 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14,
> 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar
> (SIR-C/X-SAR).  The image is centered at 20 degrees north latitude
> and 90 degrees west longitude.  Scientists believe the crater was
> formed by an asteroid or comet which slammed into the Earth more than
> 65 million years ago.   It is this impact crater that has been linked
> to a major biological catastrophe where more than  50 percent of the
> Earth's species, including the dinosaurs, became extinct.  The 180- to
> 300-kilometer-diameter (110- to 180-mile) crater is buried by 300 to
> 1,000 meters (1,000 to 3,000 feet) of limestone.  The exact size of
> the crater is currently being debated by scientists.  This is a total
> power radar image with L-band in red, C-band in green, and the
> difference between C- and L-band in blue.  The 10-kilometer-wide (6-
> mile) band of yellow and pink with blue patches along the top left
> (northwestern side) of the image is a mangrove swamp.  The blue
> patches are islands of tropical forests created by freshwater springs
> that emerge through fractures in the limestone bedrock and are most
> abundant in the vicinity of the buried crater rim.  The fracture
> patterns and wetland hydrology in this region are controlled by the
> structure of the buried crater.  Scientists are using the SIR-C/X-SAR
> imagery to study wetland ecology and help determine the exact size of
> the impact crater.
> 
> |   Omnes hic mentes mihi sunt, non Conlegioni Armorum Digitalum.      |
> |   All opinions here are mine, not Digital Equipment Corporation's.   |
> |                                                                      |
> |   Easynet: VORTEX::CALIPH::BINDER     Internet: binder@zk3.dec.com   |
> 


---
Randy Franek                           University of North Texas
Internet: Franek@cc1.unt.edu           Computing Center
Phone: (817) 565-2291                  P. O. Box 13495
FAX:   (817) 565-4060                  Denton, TX  76203-3495