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RE: sick bones



You mention Rothchild and Martin's book. Could you provide me with the 
details so I may purchase a copy? I'm assuming Rothchild is the 
Rheumatologist who claims diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH)in 
some sauropods. Advise....THNX

John Rafert       jrafert@xray.indyrad.iupui.edu
Indiana University
Department of Radiologic Sciences
Indianapolis, Ind.
1.317.274.5255............office & voice mail
1.317.274.4074............fax
 ----------
>From: dinosaur
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: sick bones
Date: Thursday, December 01, 1994 5:24PM


  What kind of information have people picked up on their travels
concerning palaeopathology of Mesozoic reptiles. I'm particularly
interested in marine reptiles and dinos.
  For instance;
   How common are pathological features?
   What bones are commonly affected?
   How species / genera specific are certain pathologies?
   What is the injury:disease pathology ratio like?

  I'm very interested in injury related pathologies - healed fravtures
especially.
  Being stuck in Britain there are rather few specemins to study. Of
course a rather large sample is required to produce any particularly
interesting results, but general observations would be interesting none
the less.
  I'm familiar with Rothschild & Martin's book - does anyone know of any
statistical studies performed on large natrual samples of Mesozoic reptiles?

  As a more general discussion, what types of pathology do people think
they are seeing? One thing to be very careful of is arthritis. There are
NO cases of osteoarthritis that I know of, despite references to the
contrary. Palaeontologists must be vrey careful about diagnosing
pathologies hastily. All the same, palaeontologists (which in my book
means anyone with an interest, not just those that call themselves
professionals) are the only people that are likely to see the less obvious
pathological structures, so I would appreciate any comments.

  Thanks very much
   Clive Trueman