[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: Deinonychus packs




On Thu, 23 Jun 1994, Scott wrote:

> >> It seems to me that's its assumed that deinonychus and it's counterparts
> >> are pack hunters. As far as I can tell, this is based on fossils found in
> >> vicinity of each other. 
> >> Sherry Michael
> 
> >IN CLOSE ASSOCIATION WOULD BE A BETTER CHOICE OF WORDS.  THE SITE WHICH
> >ALL THE PACK BEHAVIOR WAS INFERRED FROM WAS IN SOUTHERN MONTANA.  THE
> >REMAINS OF AT LEAST 4 INDIVIDUALS (DEINONYCHUS) WERE FOUND IN ASSOCIATION
> >WITH FRAGMENTARY REMAINS OF A SINGLE LARGE HERBIVOROUS DINOSAUR
> >(TENONTOSAURUS).  THE MATRIX WAS VARIEGATED SANDY BENTONITIC CLAYSTONE AND
> >SOME COARSE CHANNEL SAND, REPRESENTING OVERBANK FLOODPLAIN DEPOSITS.
> 
>   I am not saying that I think Deinonychus did not hunt in packs, but we have
> to be careful here. This is very poor evidence. The carcass of an already dead
> Tenontosaurus would become a focal point for individual hunter/scavengers to
> gather. Is there any evidence that the Deinonychus' actually killed the
> Tenontosaurus? This would seem like a risky venture. Like modern wolves, packs
> have to be desperately hungry to attack aduly, healthy, and potentially
> dangerous prey. A pack that suffers too many casualties will not survive. I
> suspect that Deinonychus would go after smaller prey whenever possible.
> 
> Scott Horton
> Geophysicist/Computer Programmer
---
The Tenontosaurus remains were very badly abraded, most likely the carcass
was transported for sometime, plus no teeth marks found on the remains...where
the Deinonychus material showed less wear and is assumed that the
Deinonychus died together and the Tenontosaurus died somewhere else and at
an earlier time.

I personally believe Deinonychus hunted loosely and not in well organized
packs.

--John Schneiderman <dino@cwis.unomaha.edu>.