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Paleontology Calendar #3



27, 28, 29, and 30 June 1995. FOSSIL HUNTING AND TOUR (near Choteau, Montana)
Paleontology Field Program of the Museum of the Rockies (Montana State
University-Bozeman). A Brief Experience in Paleontology, a one-day experience, 
well-
suited to families whose children are ages 10 and older. Includes instruction 
in 
fossil identification, several hours of badlands exploration for fossils, and a 
tour 
of paleontological sites. Contact Museum of the Rockies, Montana State 
University, 
Bozeman, MT 59717-027 [tel +1-406-994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email 
Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

Recently opened during 1995. NEW EXHIBIT (Albuquerque, New Mexico)
Ancient Evidence, Life Before Dinosaurs, featuring early Permian trackways from 
the 
Robledos Mountains, New Mexico, at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & 
Science. 
Contact Tom Williamson, Curator of Paleontology, New Mexico Museum of Natural 
History 
and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM  87104-1375 [tel 
+1-505-841-8837, 
fax +1-505-841-8866, email tom@darwin.nmmnh-abq.mus.nm.us.

8 July 1995. NEW EXHIBIT (Albuquerque, New Mexico)
FossilWorks, a paleontology preparation exhibit at the New Mexico Museum of 
Natural 
History & Science. Includes a paleo preparation laboratory where the public can 
view 
the preparation of Seismosaurus, a partial skeleton of a sauropod dinosaur 
collected 
from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of New Mexico. Preparation is done 
by 
trained museum volunteers. Contact Tom Williamson, Curator of Paleontology, New 
Mexico 
Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM  
87104-
1375 [tel +1-505-841-8837, fax +1-505-841-8866, email 
tom@darwin.nmmnh-abq.mus.nm.us.

1-7 July; 8-14 July; or 29 July-4 August. FIELD PALEONTOLOGY (near Choteau, 
Montana)
Paleontology Field Program of the Museum of the Rockies (Montana State
University-Bozeman). Introductory Field Paleontology, a week-long session that 
includes several types of field paleontology, including small tool and hard 
rock, 
excavation, prospecting for dinosaurs and other fossils in the badlands, and 
gathering 
geologic data. Also lectures, slide shows, discussions, and evening programs. 
Lodging 
is on-site in tipis. Minimum age 15. Contact Museum of the Rockies, Montana 
State 
University, Bozeman, MT 59717-027 [tel +1-406-994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email 
Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

Weekends during July and August 1995. DIG (East Coulee, Alberta)
Family Weekend Discovery (paleontology and archaeology), 2 days for the whole 
family. 
Saturdays feature a naturalist-guided badlands hike in the dinosaur-rich Red 
Deer 
River region and a fossil lab experience. Pick up a trowel at the experimental 
dig and 
explore prairie archaeological sites. Located in the Red Deer Valley prarie, 
site of 
many dinosaur finds, East Coulee is a 15 minute drive from Drumheller, the home 
of the 
Royal Tyrrell Museum, and less than two hours' drive east of Calgary. Held 
during July 
and August. $75 per family of 4 per day, $125 per family of four for 2 days. 
Groundwork Natural Science Education, Box 516, East Coulee, Alberta, T0J 1B0 
[tel or 
fax +1-403-822-3976].

Weekdays during July and August 1995. DIG (East Coulee, Alberta)
Kids Digging Dinosaurs - Junior Paleontologists. Digging, preparing, and 
assembling 
fossils in the Groundwork's hands-on fossil lab. Includes a badlands mini-hike 
with 
hands-on experience and paleo games. Located in the Red Deer Valley prarie, 
site of 
many dinosaur finds, East Coulee is a 15 minute drive from Drumheller, the home 
of the 
Royal Tyrrell Museum, and less than two hours' drive east of Calgary. Held 
weekdays 
during July and August. $9 per child. Groundwork Natural Science Education, Box 
516, 
East Coulee, Alberta, T0J 1B0 [tel or fax +1-403-822-3976].

July and August 1995. FOSSIL HUNTING (East Coulee, Alberta)
Badlands Outtripping. Remote camping experiences, scenery, wildlife, dinosaur 
fossils, 
and prehistory in the Red Deer Valley badlands. During 2 1/2 days, explore 
wildlife-
rich coulees, prospect for fossils, and discover prehistoric places such as 
ancient 
campsites. Located in the Red Deer Valley prarie, site of many dinosaur finds, 
East 
Coulee is a 15 minute drive from Drumheller, the home of the Royal Tyrrell 
Museum, and 
less than two hours' drive east of Calgary. Held during July and August. $125 
per 
person. Groundwork Natural Science Education, Box 516, East Coulee, Alberta, 
T0J 1B0 
[tel or fax +1-403-822-3976].

3 August 1995. LECTURE (Albuquerque, New Mexico)
Fossil Fever lecture series. New Mexico's Oldest Dinosaur and Other Small 
Creatures of 
the Late Triassic by Andrew B. Heckert, Adjunct Curator of Paleontology, New 
Mexico 
Museum of Natural History & Science. Contact Tom Williamson, Curator of 
Paleontology, 
New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, 
Albuquerque, 
NM  87104-1375 [tel +1-505-841-8837, fax +1-505-841-8866, email 
tom@darwin.nmmnh-
abq.mus.nm.us.

5 August 1995. SPECIMEN IDENTIFICATION (Port Townsend , Washington)
Second Annual Stump the Chumps at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Fort 
Worden 
State Park. A  team of  paleontologists , geologists, and  an archaeologist 
from 
Seattle's Burke Museum of Natural History will identify specimens collected by 
area 
residents. Participants include Peter Ward, chair of the Geology Department and 
Curator of Invertebrate fossils for the Burke; Bruce Crowley, chief preparator 
of 
fossils;  Lynn Catlin, zoologist; David Backus, trilobite specialist; Elizabeth 
Nesbitt,  marine paleoecologist; Ron Eng, collections manager of the Burke; and 
Karl 
Hutterer, archaeologist and Director of the Burke Museum. Nesbitt and Ward will 
give 
short talks on their fields of specialty. Contact Rachel Gaspers [email 
rgaspers@olympus.net].

7-17 August 1995. FIELD PALEONTOLOGY (near Choteau, Montana)
Paleontology Field Program of the Museum of the Rockies (Montana State
University-Bozeman). Advanced Vertebrate Paleontology, a two-week-long session, 
is 
similar to Introductory Field Paleontology (see separate entry for 1-7 July 
1995), but 
with more time to participate in projects in greater depth. Emphasis is on 
field 
techniques and experiences. Lodging is on-site in tipis. Minimum age 15. 
Contact 
Museum of the Rockies, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-027 [tel 
+1-406-
994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

11-13 August 1995. SHOW AND FIELD TRIPS (Sackville, New Brunswick)
Eastern Mineral Gem and Fossil Show sponsored by the Eastern Geo-collector and 
Lapidary Association. In addition to displays and demonstrations, possible 
field trips 
on 11 August include the Joggins fossil cliffs and Fossil Museum, petrified 
wood at 
Rockport and Dorchester, and petroleum history and fish fossil dig in Albert 
County, 
New Brunswick. Contact Hans Durstling [tel +1-506-536-3990].

16-20 August 1995. SHOW AND FIELD TRIP (Lebanon, Pennsylvania)
9th Annual Lost Dutchman Gemboree, which includes a show and field trips, 
including a 
trip to a Devonian fossil locality. Trip fee $20. Contact Ernesto Martinez [tel 
+1-
212-559-0938, fax +1-212-793-3963, email Ernesto.Martinez@citicorp.com].

17 August 1995. LECTURE (Albuquerque, New Mexico)
Fossil Fever lecture series. Ice Age Mammals of the Southwest by Gary S. 
Morgan, 
Adjunct Curator of Paleontology, New Mexico Museum of Natural History & 
Science. 
Contact Tom Williamson, Curator of Paleontology, New Mexico Museum of Natural 
History 
and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM  87104-1375 [tel 
+1-505-841-8837, 
fax +1-505-841-8866, email tom@darwin.nmmnh-abq.mus.nm.us.

3-8 September 1995. CONGRESS (Vigo, Spain)
Unitas Malacologia, the 12th International Malacological Congress. There is one 
session which is paleontological as well as sessions on ccology, phylogeny, 
cephalopod 
biology, and free sessions on marine and nonmarine mollusks. The Unitas 
Workshop on 
Molluscan Databases is scheduled for the Thursday during the congress. 
Discussion 
sessions during the workshop include database standards - achieving a global 
standard 
(collections, checklists, etc.), taxonomic checklists, and mapping and other 
uses of 
computers for molluscan work. Registration is $250US for nonmembers. Contact 
the 
conference organizer, Angel Guerra, who is also Unitas president, at CSIC Inst. 
de 
Investigaciones Marinas, Eduardo Cabello 6, 36208 Vigo, Spain [fax +34 86 
292762]. For 
workshop participation, contact Mary Seddon by 18 August [tel 
+44-1222-397951x244, fax 
+44-1222-239009, email Seddonm@cardiff.ac.uk].

15-17 September 1995. EXPO (Berkeley, California)
University of California Museum of Paleontology's T.rex Expo celebrates the 
unveiling 
of its new T.rex mount. 17 September: Lecture by Jack Horner, dedication, tours 
and 
reception. Admission by ticket only:  $35 for reception and lecture ($25 for 
donors), 
$10 for lecture only. Contact Judy Scotchmoor, Museum of Paleontology, 
University of 
California, Berkeley, CA 94720 [tel +1-510-642-4877; email 
judys@ucmp1.berkeley.edu].

17 September 1995. MEETING (New York, New York)
Monthly meeting of the New York Paleontological Society, Room 319, American 
Museum of 
Natural History. Reports from members on summer activities. New York 
Paleontological 
Society, P.O. Box 287 Planetarium Station, 127 West 83rd Street, New York, NY 
10024. 
Contact Donald S. Phillips [tel +1-718-252-1987 or 260-3720, email 
phillips@photon.poly.edu].

28-29 September 1995. MEETING (Cardiff, Wales)
Regional meeting of the International Geological Correlation Programme Project 
349, 
Desert Margins and Paleomonsoons of the Old World, will be held at the National 
Museum 
of Wales. The meeting will consider a variety of topics on climate change at 
desert 
margins during the past 135,000 years. These include paleontology, 
thermoluminesence 
dating, amino-acid racemization, lake-level changes, geomorphological studies, 
groundwater recharge, loess structure in Libya, human migration routes, and 
dune 
systems covering China, Eygpt, Jordan, Libya. Speakers include Ed Derbyshire, 
David 
Keen, Ian Smalley, Chris Stringer, Mike Edmunds, and Liz Feltham. Meeting is 
limited 
to 60 people, but there is still space in the program for further talks. For a 
full 
program and details about the meeting, contact Mary Seddon, Curator 
(Terrestrial 
Mollusca), National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, UK, CF1 3NP [tel. 
+44-1222-397951x244, 
fax +44-1222-239009, email Seddonm@cardiff.ac.uk].

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. 21 October 1995. NEW EXHIBIT (Denver, Coloroado)
Prehistoric Journey is the new paleontology exhibit at the Denver Museum of 
Natural 
History. The exhibit includes over 500 invertebrate, vertebrate, and plant 
fossils. 
Highlights include the dinosaurs Diplodocus, Stegosaurus, Allosaurus, 
Othneilia, 
Coelophysis, Edmontosaurus , fossil primates (articulated skeletons of "Lucy" 
and 
Smilodectes), rhinos, elephants, horses, camels, entelodonts, a chalicothere, a 
giant 
bird, titanotheres, many fish, bats, fossil flowers, and lots of invertebrates 
and 
fossil leaves.  The exhibit includes nine life-size habitat dioramas, each 
representing a major site and event in earth history (e.g., the dinosaurs, 
first 
forests, first life on land, explosion of life in the sea, the first primates, 
advent 
of the modern world, etc.). There are many interactive displays which educate 
the 
public on such topics as natural selection, radioisotopic dating, 
biostratigraphic 
correlation, and kinds of fossils. Very special exhibits include the original 
scientific apparatus used by Stanley Miller in the famous, Urey-Miller 
experiment on 
the synthesis of organic compounds from what was thought to represent the 
environment 
of early earth.  The exhibit provides a full perspective of the history of 
life. 
Contact Richard K. Stucky [email rstucky@csn.net].

5 November 1995. SHORT COURSE (New Orleans, Louisiana)
Siliceous Microfossils, 18th Annual Short Course of the Paleontological 
Society, held 
at the 107th Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America (see separate 
entry). 
Contents and contributors: Sponges as microfossils (J. Keith Rigby), Status of 
Ordovician and Silurian radiolarian studies in North America (Paula J. Noble 
and 
Jonathan C. Aitchison), Mesozoic Radiolaria (Charles D. Blome, Donna Meyerhoff 
Hull, 
Emile A. Pessagno, Jr., and Katherine M. Reed), Cenozoic Radiolaria (Annika 
Sanfilippo), Cretaceous diatoms: morphology, taxonomy, biostratigraphy (David 
M. 
Harwood and Vladimir A. Nikolaev), Cenozoic marine diatom biostratigraphy and 
applications to paleoclimatology and paleoceanography (John A. Barron and Jack 
G. 
Baldauf), Fossil continental diatoms: Paleolimnology, evolution, and 
biochronology (J. 
Platt Bradbury and William N. Krebs), Siliceous chrysophycean microfossils: 
Recent 
advances and applications to paleoenvironmental investigations (Katherine E. 
Duff and 
Barbara A. Zeeb), Silicoflagellates (Kevin McCartney), Ebridians and 
endoskeletal 
dinoflagellates (John J. Ernisee and Kevin McCartney). Contact Thomas W. 
("Woody") 
Henry, Secretary, The Paleontological Society, Box 28200-16, Lakewood, CO 
80228-3108 
[tel +1-303-236-9228, 236-5657, or 987-9293, fax +1-303-236-5690, email 
twhenry@greenwood.cr.usgs.gov.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. 10-11 November 1995. SYMPOSIUM (Denver, Colorado)
Prehistoric Journey: A Symposium on the Evolution and Ecology of Life on
Earth. Eight paleontologists will present recent findings and insights about 
evolution 
and ecology. The symposium celebrates the opening of Prehistoric Journey, 
Denver 
Museum of Natural History's new exhibit on the history of life on Earth (see 
separate 
dentry for 21 October 1995). Presentations include Mesozoic vertebrate 
evolution (Phil 
Currie, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology), Paleozoic plant evolution 
(William 
DiMichele, Smithsonian Institution), summary comments (Stephen J. Gould, 
Harvard 
University), Mesozoic and Cenozoic plant evolution (Kirk R. Johnson, Denver 
Museum of 
Natural History), life in the Precambrian (Lynn Margulis, University of 
Massachusetts), Paleozoic invertebrate evolution (Adolf Seilacher, Yale and 
Tubingen 
Universities), early Cenozoic vertebrate evolution (Richard Stucky, Denver 
Museum of 
Natural History), and late Cenozoic vertebrate evolution (Elisabeth Vrba, Yale 
University). Syposium includes public lecture on 10 November by Stephen J. 
Gould, 
scientific lectures by all participants on 11 November, and a special tour of 
the 
Prehistoric Journey exhibit on 11 November. $105 for museum members, $110 for 
nonmembers. Contact Central Reservations, Denver Museum of Natural History, 
2001 
Colorado Boulevard, Denver, CO 80205 [tel 800-925-2250 (toll-free United States 
only) 
or +1-303-322-7009, fax +1-303-331-6492] or Richard Stucky [email 
rstucky@csn.net].

18 November 1995. MEETING (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Monthly meeting of the New York Paleontological Society. Behind-the-Scenes at 
the 
Academy of Natural Sciences. Led by Curator Ted Daeschler, we'll be seeing some 
of the 
classic finds in American paleontology, including the Haddonfield Hadrosaur - 
America's first dinosaur find (we'll be seeing the original not on public 
display), 
the claws of Thomas Jefferson's _Megalonyx_, the only fossils brought back by 
Lewis 
and Clark on their historic expedition, etc. Current research will also be 
emphasized. 
New York Paleontological Society, P.O. Box 287 Planetarium Station, 127 West 
83rd 
Street, New York, NY 10024. Contact Donald S. Phillips [tel +1-718-252-1987 or 
260-
3720, email phillips@photon.poly.edu].

28 November-3 December 1995. CONVENTION (Colindale, United Kingdom)
Dinosaur Convention at Yaohan Plaza, Edgeware Road, Colindale (1 mile north of 
M1/north circular junction). Contact D.W. Naish [email dwn194@soton.ac.uk].

29 June-5 July 1996. FIELD CAMP (north-central Montana)
Museum of the Rockies 1996 Introductory Dinosaur Paleontology Sessions. If your 
group 
is interested in dinosaur paleontology, these week-long sessions will provide 
them 
with a wide range of experiences relation to field work, research, and the 
latest 
thinking about dinosaurs. The experience is open to adults and teens (15 and 
older). 
Most of the week will be spent outdoors. This field experience requires 
moderate to 
strenuous physical activity. Participants should be in good physical shape and 
prepared to walk at least 5 miles per day. The field site is located about 4200 
feet 
above sea level. Nights can be quite cool (35F). The Camp is at the Willow 
Creek 
Anticline, on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains near Choteau, Montana, 
90 miles 
south of Glacier National Park. This is the area were Jack Horner discovered 
the 
remains of dinosaur nesting colonies. Fossil finds here include dinosaur eggs, 
embryos, nests of several species, and a massive bone-bed of Maiasaura 
peeblesorum 
fossils. The site is now owned and protected by the Nature Conservancy. Housing 
is in 
Blackfeet tipis on the site. Sessions also held 6-12 July, 13-19 July, 20-26 
July, and 
27 July-2 August. Contact Museum of the Rockies, Montana State University, 
Bozeman, MT 
59717-027 [tel +1-406-994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email 
Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

6-12 July 1996. FIELD CAMP (north-central Montana)
Museum of the Rockies 1996 Introductory Dinosaur Paleontology Sessions. If your 
group 
is interested in dinosaur paleontology, these week-long sessions will provide 
them 
with a wide range of experiences relation to field work, research, and the 
latest 
thinking about dinosaurs. The experience is open to adults and teens (15 and 
older). 
Most of the week will be spent outdoors. This field experience requires 
moderate to 
strenuous physical activity. Participants should be in good physical shape and 
prepared to walk at least 5 miles per day. The field site is located about 4200 
feet 
above sea level. Nights can be quite cool (35F). The Camp is at the Willow 
Creek 
Anticline, on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains near Choteau, Montana, 
90 miles 
south of Glacier National Park. This is the area were Jack Horner discovered 
the 
remains of dinosaur nesting colonies. Fossil finds here include dinosaur eggs, 
embryos, nests of several species, and a massive bone-bed of Maiasaura 
peeblesorum 
fossils. The site is now owned and protected by the Nature Conservancy. Housing 
is in 
Blackfeet tipis on the site. Sessions also held 29 June-5 July, 13-19 July, 
20-26 
July, and 27 July-2 August. Contact Museum of the Rockies, Montana State 
University, 
Bozeman, MT 59717-027 [tel +1-406-994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email 
Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

13-19 July 1996. FIELD CAMP (north-central Montana)
Museum of the Rockies 1996 Introductory Dinosaur Paleontology Sessions. If your 
group 
is interested in dinosaur paleontology, these week-long sessions will provide 
them 
with a wide range of experiences relation to field work, research, and the 
latest 
thinking about dinosaurs. The experience is open to adults and teens (15 and 
older). 
Most of the week will be spent outdoors. This field experience requires 
moderate to 
strenuous physical activity. Participants should be in good physical shape and 
prepared to walk at least 5 miles per day. The field site is located about 4200 
feet 
above sea level. Nights can be quite cool (35F). The Camp is at the Willow 
Creek 
Anticline, on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains near Choteau, Montana, 
90 miles 
south of Glacier National Park. This is the area were Jack Horner discovered 
the 
remains of dinosaur nesting colonies. Fossil finds here include dinosaur eggs, 
embryos, nests of several species, and a massive bone-bed of Maiasaura 
peeblesorum 
fossils. The site is now owned and protected by the Nature Conservancy. Housing 
is in 
Blackfeet tipis on the site. Sessions also held 29 June-5 July, 6-12 July, 
20-26 July, 
and 27 July-2 August. Contact Museum of the Rockies, Montana State University, 
Bozeman, MT 59717-027 [tel +1-406-994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email 
Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

15-17 July 1996. MEETING (Granada, Spain)
IV International Cephalopod Symposium - Present and Past. Official languages: 
Spanish 
and English. Possible topics: development and evolution; form, construction, 
and 
function; ecology, paleoecology, and taphonomy; biogeography and 
paleobiogeography; 
and cephalopods in basin analysis. Deadlines: abstracts submission (1 December 
1995), 
abstracts acceptance (31 January 1996), registration (1 March 1996), and third 
circular (31 May 1996). See separate entry for field trip on 18 July. $208.50. 
Contact 
Organising Committee Secretary - Scientific Information, Federico Oloriz 
Saez/Francisco Javier Rodriguez-Tovar, Dpto. Estratigrafia y Paleontologia, 
Univ. 
Granada, Avd. Fuente Nueva s/n. 18002 Granada, Spain [email 
fjrtovar@goliat.ugr.es].

18 July 1996. FIELD TRIP (southern Sapin)
Facies, fossil assemblages, and ammonite successions in epicontinental shelves 
and 
epioceanic swells (Middle Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous). The field trip is 
focused on 
the recognition of two sections, the first belonging to epicontinental shelves 
(Sierra 
de Cazorla) and the second to epioceanic swells (Sierra Gorda). In these 
sections we 
can analyze the evolution of megainvertebrate fossil assemblages (with special 
atention to ammonite sucessions), as well as their relationship with facies 
evolution. 
We will try to show the existing possibilities for the correlation between 
fossil 
assemblages evolution and the local tectono-eustatic context. In this way we 
will 
approach the ecostratigraphic interpretation in the visited sections. Held in 
association with the IV International Cephalopod Symposium - Present and Past 
(see 
separate entry for 15-17 July). $41.50. Contact Organising Committee Secretary 
- 
Scientific Information, Federico Oloriz Saez/Francisco Javier Rodriguez-Tovar, 
Dpto. 
Estratigrafia y Paleontologia, Univ. Granada, Avd. Fuente Nueva s/n. 18002 
Granada, 
Spain [email fjrtovar@goliat.ugr.es].

20-26 July 1996. FIELD CAMP (north-central Montana)
Museum of the Rockies 1996 Introductory Dinosaur Paleontology Sessions. If your 
group 
is interested in dinosaur paleontology, these week-long sessions will provide 
them 
with a wide range of experiences relation to field work, research, and the 
latest 
thinking about dinosaurs. The experience is open to adults and teens (15 and 
older). 
Most of the week will be spent outdoors. This field experience requires 
moderate to 
strenuous physical activity. Participants should be in good physical shape and 
prepared to walk at least 5 miles per day. The field site is located about 4200 
feet 
above sea level. Nights can be quite cool (35F). The Camp is at the Willow 
Creek 
Anticline, on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains near Choteau, Montana, 
90 miles 
south of Glacier National Park. This is the area were Jack Horner discovered 
the 
remains of dinosaur nesting colonies. Fossil finds here include dinosaur eggs, 
embryos, nests of several species, and a massive bone-bed of Maiasaura 
peeblesorum 
fossils. The site is now owned and protected by the Nature Conservancy. Housing 
is in 
Blackfeet tipis on the site. Sessions also held 29 June-5 July, 6-12 July, 
13-19 July, 
and 27 July-2 August. Contact Museum of the Rockies, Montana State University, 
Bozeman, MT 59717-027 [tel +1-406-994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email 
Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

27 July-2 August 1996. FIELD CAMP (north-central Montana)
Museum of the Rockies 1996 Introductory Dinosaur Paleontology Sessions. If your 
group 
is interested in dinosaur paleontology, these week-long sessions will provide 
them 
with a wide range of experiences relation to field work, research, and the 
latest 
thinking about dinosaurs. The experience is open to adults and teens (15 and 
older). 
Most of the week will be spent outdoors. This field experience requires 
moderate to 
strenuous physical activity. Participants should be in good physical shape and 
prepared to walk at least 5 miles per day. The field site is located about 4200 
feet 
above sea level. Nights can be quite cool (35F). The Camp is at the Willow 
Creek 
Anticline, on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains near Choteau, Montana, 
90 miles 
south of Glacier National Park. This is the area were Jack Horner discovered 
the 
remains of dinosaur nesting colonies. Fossil finds here include dinosaur eggs, 
embryos, nests of several species, and a massive bone-bed of Maiasaura 
peeblesorum 
fossils. The site is now owned and protected by the Nature Conservancy. Housing 
is in 
Blackfeet tipis on the site. Sessions also held 29 June-5 July, 6-12 July, 
13-19 July, 
and 20-26 July. Contact Museum of the Rockies, Montana State University, 
Bozeman, MT 
59717-027 [tel +1-406-994-6618] or Maury Irvine [email 
Maury_Irvine@iris.gomontana.com].

7-13 September 1996. MEETING (Cork, Ireland)
5th International Symposium on Littorinid Biology, held at University College 
Cork. 
Previous meetings on this group of gastropods have been held in London, Sweden, 
Wales, 
and France. The meetings are always successful and friendly; students are 
welcomed, 
and (when it comes to presenting papers) it is not uncommon for other 
intertidal 
gastropods such as muricids and trochids to be declared "honorary littorinids". 
Although no papers on fossil littorinids are expected, any who are interested 
in 
intertidal ecology, past or present, would find much of interest at the 
meeting. The 
last meeting was attended by some 50 people from about 20 countries. 
Accomodation has 
been arranged in townhouses and apartments in a holiday village, ideal for 
families, 
adjacent to the main campus of UCC (where lectures will take place). Field 
trips will 
be arranged. For details, contact the organizers, Ruth O'Riordan and Gavin 
Burnell, 
Department of Zoology, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, 
Cork City, 
Ireland [fax +353 21 270562]. Entry contributed by David Reid at the Natural 
History 
Museum (London) [email D.reid@nhm.ac.uk].

2-10 August 1997. CONGRESS (Prague, Czech Republic)
3rd World Congress of Herpetology will cover all fields of herpetology, 
including 
paleoherpetology. The scientific programme will be divided into two parts, with 
one 
intervening day of professional excursions. It is expected that there will be 
some 
accompanying events such as the exhibition in the National Museum,"Origin and 
Evolution of European Herpetofauna", where both fossil and contemporary 
amphibians and 
reptiles will be seen on the backkground of European paleogeography. A 
post-Congress 
tour through southern Germany will include Archaeopteryx and ichthyosaurs. For 
information or to be added to the mailing list, contact Zbynek Rocek, Congress 
Director, Department of Paleontology, Academy of Sciences, Rozvojova 135, 165 
00 
Prague 6 - Suchdol, Czech Republic [tel +42 2 24311421, fax +42 2 24311578, 
email 
rocek@gli.cas.cz, World Wide Web www.gli.cas.cz].


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   Larry Bowlds - Bulletin Managing Editor
   lbowlds@geosociety.org
   Geological Society Of America
   3300 Penrose Place
   Boulder, CO  80301   USA
   Phone: (303) 447-2020 x147     FAX: (303) 442-5005
   GSA WWW Home Page= http://www.aescon.com/geosociety/index.html
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