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BINTURONG DIET..



> Anyway, the binturong is an omnivore.  Walker's Mammals of the World lists
> fish, birds, carrion, fruit, leaves and shoots among its dietary choices.
(Ronald Orenstein)

D'OH! 

However, please note that pandas, both little _Ailurus_ and ursid _Ailuropoda_,
are herbivores in the same boat (I'm only saying boat because I don't know which
version of 'vane' is correct). According to David McDonald, carnivoran expert,
binturongs are adapted for fruit eating.. Don't forget that the giant panda is
labelled a herbivore, but has been known to KILL (not just scavenge) .. KILL
birds and small deer. In any case, arctoids in general are so generalised they
can eat whatever they want (e.g. wolves sometimes get by on berries).

It's always interesting to bring what we know about carnivorous mammals into the
theropod realm, but obviously carnivorous theropods seem as much carnivorous as
felids - no munching on mangoes for them (but note, as I said a while back, that
Jaguarondi will eat fallen fruit. Bonnie Blackwell reminds me that cats eat
grass too.. but that's another matter entirely). 

I don't think that any known theropods would have been as opportunistic as these
mammals, for even those traditionally assigned broad omnivorous roles are
conceivably moderately, or very, specialised. Then again, it is to birds that
we must constantly turn to learn/speculate about dinosaur behaviour. Truly
opportunistic birds don't make good analogies for non-avian theropods, though,
because they can fly! A thought worth considering (IMHO,O) and analyzing is that
generalised omnivore niches in the Mesozoic weren't filled by theropods at all,
but by lesothosaurs, hypsilophodonts, heterodontosaurs and pachycephalosaurs...
unless we already have a host of little SEMI-ARBOREAL dino-birds doing the job.

I'll shut up now.. 

"Four hundred and twe--- "  "Wait! I misplaced the decimal point" "Thank
heavens" "Four THOUSAND, one hundred and twenty years!"

DARREN NAISH