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Dino Extinctions & Space Debris



Dino Extinction Theories are just that.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
>Forwarded by:
>Terry W. Colvin <colvint@cc.ims.disa.mil>       Voice: [520]538-5392
 
>Subject: Extinction (Dinosaurs)
 
>The following is Box 6-4 in Chapter 6, Evolutionary Record, in my
>college textbook, "Understanding Physical Anthropology and Archeology",
>4th Ed., 1990, Robert Jurmain, Harry Nelson, William A. Turnbaugh, pub-
>lished by West Publishing Company.....
 
>                        'Authors, with varying competence, have
>suggested that the dinosaurs disappeared because.....the diet
>(changed) .....from poisons in water or plants or ingested minerals...
>....disease, parasites, wars, anatomical or metabolic disorders (slipped
>vertebral discs, malfunctions or imbalance of hormone or endocrine
>systems, dwindling brain and consequent stupidity, heat sterilization,)
>.....poison gases,.... overkill capacity by predators.....development
>of *psychotic suicidal factors*.....
 
Maybe they caught a bad case of civilization. Thence few would end
up preserved in rock for our discovery.
 
>     The Berkeley group theorized that an asteroid struck the earth,
>forming an enormous crater over 100 miles across. Dust ejected from the
>crater reached the stratosphere and then spread around the earth. This
>phenomenon effectively blocked sunlight from reach the earth's surface
>for about two and a half years, suppressing photosynthesis. Most food
>chains collapsed and mass extinctions, including dinosaurs, followed.
 
Not "an asteroid". When cometary material reaches the inner solar
system the gas giants can break it up into myriads of fragments.
Conside an SL-9 sort of bombardment of Earth, only worse, along
with a few thousand Tunguska events....
 
> .....suggest that extinctions occur in periods of 26 million years,
 
I think that is too simplistic. Mass extinctions were considered
back in the '70's and the graphs showed no convinving degree of
periodicity. Nor is it much better now, it seems.
 
>driven by solar system or galactic forces. Later, other scientists
>identified this driving force to be a small companion star of our sun,
>dubbed "Nemesis" (often referred to as the "Death Star"). Nemesis, it
>was argued, orbits the sun every 26 million years, and when it
>approaches the sun it passes through a cloud (called the Oort cloud)
>of billions of comets. Because of the gravitational force of Nemesis,
>some of the comets are deflected in random ways and some would move
>toward earth. It would have been one of these that struck the earth
>and wreaked the havoc of mass extinctions.....
 
 Earth and the other inner planets and moons would have been slammed
 with vast clouds of dust and ice-mist as well as marble-sized rocks
 and hail-sized chunks of ice, also hunks of frozen methane and
 ammonia such that vast areas of the geography would light up
 or suddenly be deep frozen or be gassed, also rocks of all
 sorts of minerals including ice from the size of fridges up
 to hills to mountains to mountain ranges. It would have been
 quite a light show.
 
>Opponents to the Nemesis theory have raised a number of questions:
>(1)  Isn't this a form of Cuvier's catastrophism (see Chapter 2) that
>was rejected more than a century ago? Is Darwinian fitness no longer
>applicable?
 Vaguely, and of course not.
 
>(2)  What defines mass extinction? When does ordinary extinction become
>mass extinction? Does extraterrestrial action cause immediate mass ex-
>tinction? If an extinction occurs over a long period of time, say a
>million years, can an asteroid be considered the cause?
Lots of species dying off. When it happens faster. It can. Yes,
as you can confirm if you look into basic orbital mechanics.
 
>(5)  How accurate are the dating methods used to date species that have
>gone extinct?
Good enough and getting better. It is how well the data is used that lags.
 
>(6)  What evidence is there for the existence of Nemesis, since no one
>has seen it?
 
Statistically, it almost certainly exists since most stars form
multiple systems and the sun is so old it may well have a companion
that has long since gone cold. But where is it out there?
 
>(7)  What about terrestrial explanations such as cooling temperatures
>due to continental drift, sea level fluctuations, sea-floor spreading,
>volcanic activity, and geomagnetic reversals, etc.? Have these been
>studied as thoroughly as they could be?
 
We know very little, which does not stop the global military-industrial
complex from continuing to run an uncontrolled experiment including
a mass extinction event more rapid than any in 5 billion years.
 
>     The matter of dinosaur extinction is part of the larger problem of
>mass extinctions. No one has yet proposed an explanation that is widely
>accepted by paleontologists, biologists, astronomers, and other
>scientists.
 
We need to think a little more urgently about the imminent threat
of mass human extinction from:
 
> diet.....from poisons in water or plants or ingested minerals...
>....disease, parasites, wars, anatomical or metabolic disorders (slipped
>vertebral discs, malfunctions or imbalance of hormone or endocrine
>systems, dwindling brain and consequent stupidity, heat sterilization,)
>.....poison gases,.... overkill capacity by predators.....development
>of *psychotic suicidal factors*.....
 
Sleep well, ALL.
                                        Lawrie Williams