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Re: Warm- vs. Cold-blooded Dinos



> > It has been suggeted that there was little temperature stratification 
> > between the equator and the poles during this time. 
>
[...]
>of the Alaskan north slope during the Late Cretaceous showed an
>average annual temperature of about 5 degrees Centigrade.  Given
>that there would have been an extended period of dark in the winter,
>this implies that temperatures probably dropped below freezing almost
>every year, at least for a few days.

Just a thought.

Is it possible that the Earth's tilt has varied in the last few billion
years? My guess is that it is.

My gut feeling is that the earth formed 4.5 or so billion years ago, it
would have been level, and that over the eons it has "drooped". Now if it
goes from level to seven or so degrees (or whatever it is), 200 odd million
years isn't very significant. But what if it is like a spinning top, where
it would go through periods of much greater tilt than now, back to level and
out again?

Anyway, if the Earth were more level in the Mesozoic, then the seasons would
have been much more even and far less of the poles would be in extended
darkness during the winter.

Perhaps there's an astrophysics student on the list who knows if this is
possible, and what work has been done on this sort of thing.

Please excuse my inane ramblings.

James Shields  -  jshields@iol.ie  -  http://www.iol.ie/~jshields
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
And when the ark was finished Noah said unto Elvis, "What do you reckin?"
And Elvis checked out his own cabin and shook his head saying "poky".
And so did they knock several walls through and install a jaccuzzi.
And when it was all done Noah scratched his beard and said, "We don't have
room for all the animals now."
And Elvis perused the livestock list and in his wisdom said, "Lose the
dinosaurs."
        -Robert Rankin, The Suburban Book of the Dead