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Re: Thanks for the info



The exchange below is for those list members who feel most if not all seekers
of information are pursuing the quick and dirty approach to research.  Trina
strikes me as a young person acquiring information from many sources, who truly
wants to do the work.

I favor the attitude Betty Cunningham has in her post today.  Yes, these are
"pretty sophisticated kids", "*possibly* dinosaur nuts", and "enamored of the
Net".  Besides as the Internet expands "we" on various mailing lists will find
ourselves reading these posts more often.  The FAQ approach will answer most
questions.

Mickey says "It seems universal -- nobody thinks we should do other peoples'
homework".  I agree generally, but what of those students with access to poorer
libraries in rural America or elsewhere in the world?

Terry W. Colvin
<colvint@cc.ims.disa.mil>
Cochise County, Arizona

______________________________ Forward Header __________________________________
Subject: Re: Thanks for the info
Author:  Terry Colvin at FHU2
Date:    17/3/1995 7:37 AM


Hello Trina,
     Glad I could help.  BTW, a short excerpt from my textbook follows:
*Understanding Physical Anthropology and Archeology* by Robert Jurmain, 
Harry Nelson, William A. Turnbaugh; 1990, West Publishing Co., 50 W. 
Kellogg Blvd., P.O. Box 64526, St. Paul, MN 55164-1003.  Quote.
BOX 6-4 Extinction, pp. 143 & 144.  The theories that have been propounded (to 
explain the extinction of dinosaurs) are legion, and one cannot do better than 
quote Jepsen on this topic: "'Authors, with varying competence, have suggested 
that the dinosaurs disappeared because the climate deteriorated (became 
suddenly or slowly too hot or cold or dry or wet), or that the diet did (with 
too much food or not enough of such substances as fern oil; from poisons in 
water or plants or ingested minerals; the bankruptcy of calcium or other 
necessary elements). Other writers have put the blame on disease. para- sites, 
wars, anatomical or metabolic disorders (slipped vertebral discs, malfunctions 
or imbalance of hormone or endocrine systems, dwindling brain and consequent 
stupidity, heat sterilization), racial old age, evolutionary drift into 
senescent overspecialization, changes in the pressure or composition of the 
atmosphere, poison gases, volcanic dust, excessive oxygen from plants, 
meteorites, comets, gene pool drainage by little mammalian egg-eaters, overkill 
capacity by predators, fluctuation of gravitational constants, development of 
psychotic suicidal factors, entropy, cosmic radiation, shift of Earth's 
rotational poles, floods, extraction of the moon from the Pacific Basin, 
drainage of swamp and lake environments, sunspots, God's will, mountain 
building, raids by little green hunters in flying saucers, lack of even 
standing room in Noah's Ark, and palaeoweltschmertz'"  (Jepsen, in Halstead, 
1968, pp. 146-147).  Unquote.
     Well, Trina, that probably covers the gamut and it is safe to ASSume
that one or more of the above did cause extinction.  Hope you can use this 
material.  Use me as the researcher of note if you really want to.  I'm not 
a professional; just a talented amateur [:)].
     Oh, my snail mail address is:
     (Mr.) Terry W. Colvin
     300 Highland Drive
     Sierra Vista, Arizona  85635
Ciao,
Terry

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Thanks for the info
Author:  Trina Michelle Graham <trinag@sfu.ca> at smtp 
Date:    16/3/1995 9:18 PM


Hello,
I'd like to thank you for the information you sent me.  I read it.  I 
did lots of research in the library and I have piles of info.  The 
project that I'm doing is a poster for my Ecology course so I can't 
send you a paper.  I can though send you a photograph of it if you 
like you can mail me your address.  Also, what is your textbook's 
title.

Thanks again,
Trina Graham.
.,