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Re: New York Times article on _Confuciusornis_



Dinogeorge wrote:

>Here's the whole text, courtesy of AOL's New York Times connection:
>
>VERY EARLY BIRD HAD WAY TO CATCH WORMS: IN BEAK
>
>By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
>
>c.1995 N.Y. Times News Service

[deleted]

>In one striking respect, this primitive bird had taken a precocious
>evolutionary step that seemed to anticipate every bird of today, every eagle
>and robin and chickadee: there was not a tooth in its head.
>
>This is the earliest bird known to paleontology to have abandoned the toothy
>jaws of its reptilian ancestors, replacing them with a true avian beak.

This is odd. In the Proceedings of the recent conference in China, the
paper on Confuciusornis states in part:
"In Archaeopteryx there are many pointed teeth within the lower jaw trough;
while in Confuciusornis no teeth is found, except very few teeth
impressions on the premaxilla." (p. 99) (thanks to Dan Chure)

There seems to be some confusion here.

Chris

cnedin@geology.adelaide.edu.au                  nedin@ediacara.org
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Many say it was a mistake to come down from the trees, some say
the move out of the oceans was a bad idea. Me, I say the stiffening
of the notochord in the Cambrian was where it all went wrong,
it was all downhill from there.