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Large Theropod Mating (was Dinosaurian Mating)



NOTICE: IF YOU ARE EASILY OFFENDED BY THE DISCUSSION OF SEX OR ANY OF ITS
TERMINOLOGY  AND IMPLICATIONS, DO NOT READ ANY FURTHER.

I have attempted to keep this post as "clean" and professional as possible
and in a strict scientific sense and  no other sense is implied!



Well here goes my forray into the world of dino-reproduction theory!

It would seem to me that large theropods,  especially T. rex  due to their
small arms,  and being obligately bipedal would have to overcome the natural
instability of trying to copulate "standing straight up" ( a tricky method
even for us bipeds).  The addition of a tail could make matters a little more
tricky especially for the female who would have to raise her tial to a higher
than usual position to accomodate the male T. rex  (hemipenes?).  The answer
to this sexual dilemma would seem to involve taking  lessons from the varied
positions that humans have been known to "do it", albeit with other
anotomical features included or excluded.

1) The female would have to pivot forward about the axis of her hip joint,
lowering her whole body closer to the ground (like the four point stance of a
football player) and simultaneously raising her tail enough to give her mate
"the proper angle" for copulation.
    But since there would appear to be inherent instability in this position
not just for a single large theropod but two large theropods locked in an
amorous embrace, it would  seem to require the use of, for lack of a better
phrase, _a_sexual_aid_.

2) This "sexual aid" could be any object form trees to rock  outcrops whereby
the female could balance herself using her (much reduced) forearms as the
counterbalance during the embrace (analogous to some human sexual positions).


The beauty of this hypothesis (in my view at least) is that it helps explain
a use for the purported 'uselssness" of the T. rex  forelimbs. Of course,
other theropods with longer or more powerful forelimbs would be able to
accomplish this act even more easily and may be modified depending on the
genera involved.

I have pondered this for some time and the idea is an aggregate of methods
employed by snakes (uplift of tail), turtles and lizards (squatting) mammals
and humans (positions and props). 


                                          Regards,
                                          Thomas R. Lipka
                                           Paleontological/Geological Studies