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Batch o refs



 A batch of stuff for your consideration:

 A paper on a new specimen, apparently a juvenile, of the Neodiapsid
 Drepanosaurus. Just the butt end but nicely preserved - from the Upper
 Traissic of Italy.

 Renesto, S. & A. Paganoni. 1995. A new Drepanosaurus (Reptilia,
   Neodiapsida) from the Upper Triassic of Northern Italy.
   N. Jb. Geol. Palaeont. Abh.   197(1):87-99.

 The Nature with the article by Sanz' group on all those dino eggs
 on the beach is in. Pretty darned neat!

 Sanz, J.L., J.J.Moratalla, M. Diaz-Molina, N. Lopez-Martinez, O. Kalin,
    and M. Vianey-Liaud. 1995. Dinosaur nests at the sea shore.
    Nature 376:731-732. 31AUG95.

 These are Maastrichtian (Upper K) from Spain (in the Pyrenees).
 Lots of eggs in an apparently long re-used nesting area on the beach.

 In the 14SEPT95 Nature is a bunch of stuff. We'll start with  a note
 on a synsacrum fragment from the Upper Cretaceous of France that's
 apparently from a very large bird:

 Buffetaut, E., J. Le Loeuff, P. Mechin & A. Mechin-Salessy. 1995.
   A large French Cretaceous Bird. Nature 377:110. 14SEPT95

 They suggest that a lot of regional dino eggs may indeed be birds.

 In that issue there is also a note on how bad Down House (Darwin's)
 has been allowed to deteriorate to and efforts to re-fix it up. Would be
 nice if sometime we would take care of things first rather than fix em
 later.

 Then there are two important papers on mammal history based on the
 mammalian mother lode specimens found by the AMNH in the Gobi. These are

 Sereno, Paul C. & M.C. McKenna. 1995. Cretaceous multituberculate
   skeleton and the early evolution of the mammalian shoulder girdle.
   Nature 377:144-147. 14SEPT95

 Paul, roving out of the dinosaurs for a while, and McKenna show a
 new reconstruction of the shoulder in a multi and show this to suggest
 a connection between the multi and therian mammals - the Theriiformes
 with Monotremes as the sister group.

 Meng, Jin & A.R. Wyss. 1995. Monotreme affinities and low-frequency
   hearing suggested by multituberculate ear. Nature 377:141-144. 14SEPT95

 Amazing stuff on specimens of multis with ectotympanic bones associated
 with the malleus in life position. The structure is very monotreme
 like suggesting that multis are sister taxon to monotremes and
 not to theria as just suggested by S&McK. This is getting real
 neat and I look forward to more stuff.

 A summary article in front is:

 Presley, R. 1995. Some neglected relatives. Nature 377:104-5. 14SEPT95
 I wanna thank you very much... Sorry thats E. Presley.

 As expected, replies to Science defending the honor of amateurs and
 banging the horn for the work SVP is doing on collecting laws (in the latter)
 by Richard Stucky, Peter Robinson & Brooks Britt in the first and
 Michael Woodburne in the latter. This relates to the story told previously
 about the Parker family finding a beast on private property and not
 realizing it was and the stuff that ensued. Science 269:1497. 15SEPT95

 The August 95 issue of Lapidary Journal has a bunch of stuff on dinos,
 Cretaceous sharks and Internet tours and the like. Check it out.

 A neat article on environments across the Permian-Triassic boundary
 and the terrestrial fauna of the Karoo, especially the famous dicynodon
 fauna.

 Smith, R.M.H. 1995. Changing fluvial environments across the Permian-
   Triassic boundary in the Karoo Basin, South Africa and possible
   causes of tetrapod extinctions. Palaeogeo. Palaeoclimat. Palaeoecol.
   117:81-104. Things dried up and things died. Nice detailed work

 Davis, P.G. and D.E.G. Briggs. 1995. Fossilization of feathers.
    Geology 23(9):783-786.

 nice review article on how and when feathers fossilize and showing
 that you will get biases favoring preservation in inland water habitats.
 In marine and nonaquatic environments you neeed reallll special conditions
 (e.g., amber). Derek's groups have done some great taphonomic studies
 lately.

 More in a bit....

 Ralph Chapman, NMNH