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Re: HUMPING ARCHAEOCETES (SNIGGER)



     >Nope.  In both examples, Orcas never fully leave the water, and the
     >desribed behavior usually occurs on an inclined surface (take a look 
     >at the special shelves in the Orca tanks, the next time you're at Sea 
     >World.
     
     I've seen Orca go up on sand bars in northern California after 
     California Sea Lions.  Turned one practically inside out.  I was 13, 
     it made a big impression on me at the time (and only about 100 feet 
     away, brrrrr....)(didn't go near the water for the rest of the trip)
     
     Sandbars tend not to tilt so much as ice.
     
     I see your point about the tails not used, it held the flukes up off 
     the ground by a large distance (curved up over it's back almost) as it 
     totally emerged from the water and travelled from one side of the 
     sandbar to the other (admittedly the short side) in it's snatching of 
     a seal.
     
     -Betty