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dino web sites & thanks



To all the helpful dino listers, here is the list as compiled now for
dino web sites.  I think one or two web sites are duplicated here, but
this is it for now.

The hadrosaur locality: 
http://tigger.jvnc.net/~levins/hadrosaurus.html.  

Dinosaurs:
American Museum of Natural History
http://www.amnh.org"; 

Goofs: Jurassic Park 
http://www.cm.cf.ac.uk/M/title-goofs?+=jurassic+park

The Hunterian Museum: Dinosaurs & Fossils
http://www.gla.ac.uk:80/Museum/HuntMus/dinosaur/

Dinosaur Art
http://www.indyrad.iupui.edu/dinoart.html
        
Royal Tyrrell Museum
http://www.cuug.ab.ca:8001/VT/tyrrell/

Royal Tyrrell Museum Tour: Dinosaur Hall
http://www.cuug.ab.ca:8001/VT/tyrrell/tour/dinohall.html

http://www.calweb.com/~tcsmith/ores/geology/paleo/

Friends of Paleo, New Mexico Museum of Natural History
http://www.unm.edu/~greywolf/test/nmfp.html

The Dinostore:
   http://www.infinet.com/~jpoling/

AMNH Web Site 
http://www.amnh.org.  

http://www.indyrad.iupui.edu/dinoart.html

http://infolane.com/infolane/apunix/dinoeggs.html

University of Glasgow's home page at:-
http://www.gla.ac.uk/

Hadrosaurs:
http://tigger.jvnc.net/~levins/hadrosaurus.html
An extensive new Web feature takes viewers back in history and down
into the 30-foot ravine where the world's first nearly-complete dinosaur
skeleton was found in 1858 in New Jersey along the eastern coast of the
United States.

**********************
http://www.gla.ac.uk/Museum/
The Hunterian Museum's web site now includes a large number of images 
relating to its exhibition.  This includes pages on dinosaurs and the 
discovery of dinosaurs in Scotland.  

http://www.gla.ac.uk/Museum/HuntMus/dinosaur/

http://www.gla.ac.uk/Museum/HuntMus/earth/index.html
********************
Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology's website 
http://www.cuug.ab.ca:8001/VT/tyrrell/
***********************
The Paleontological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences
http://ucmpl.berkeley.edu/pin.htlm
*****************************
 http://skullduggery.com.  
There's an interesting article  by George Olshevsky.
************
Tree of Life Project. 
http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/phylogeny.html 
***************************
University of California Museum of Paleontology home page
http://ucmp1.berkeley.edu/
or go directly to the dino pages
 http://ucmp1.berkeley.edu/exhibittext/dinosaur.html
****************************
Russ' Lair/ list of dino digs
http://jacobson.isgs.uiuc.edu
I have a dinosaur site with many links on dinosaurs and vertebrate
paleontology that you should check our for your first year class. 
*****
Lost World Web site
http://www.randomhouse.com/site/lostworld/

There's a rather sparse list of "story-related" links, a Quicktime movie of
(parts of) the T-rex's attack on the herd of dinos from JP, and some
excerpts from the story.  According to one of those, Crichton didn't learn
much from his previous visit to JP; he's *still* using electric vehicles,
this time with photovoltaic cells and experimental lithium-ion
battteries--and no backup systems.  (These aren't vehicles left over from
the original story, they are brought to the site by the new scientists.)

Be warned, however, that the *only* way to see any this stuff is with a
browser that supports imagemaps--there are NO text links.  Another good
example of bad Web design, this page even uses Netscape's exclusive (since
it's not part of any standard) "client pull" technology to load images.

If you don't do imagemaps, the most interesting text excerpt can be found
at <http://www.randomhouse.com/site/lostworld/rex.html>, and the movies
(the page suggests there are two movies, but the URLs point to the same
place) are at <http://www.randomhouse.com/site/lostworld/video.html>.

*******
Dinosaur Art and Modeling page at:
http://www.indyrad.iupui.edu/dinoart.html

********
  The National Science Museum, Tokyo, the most biggest science 
museum in Japan, started WWW information service at :

http://www.kahaku.go.jp

  You can see text information and very small picture of Futabasuzuki-
ryu (one of the most complete fossil of plesiosaurs found from Japan)
at the Midori-kan 4th floor (green in the map), but the English page is 
constructing now.

******
http://www.io.com/sjgames/ - dinosaurs, Lego, Kahlua!
******
http://www.gla.ac.uk/Museum/

You should look at both the 'dinosaur' and 'Earth-Life' pages to find 
out about fossils and dinosaurs.


My thanks to the following people who helped me compile this list:
Marion Hanson, Russ (Lair) Jacobson, David Meyer, Jeff Polling, Mike Tipping,
Ted Smith, Alan Geralnick, Neil Clark, Kiran Wagle, Jay Rafferty, and
a helpful Japanese dino lister whose name my system garbles.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bonnie Blackwell,                               bonn@qcvaxa.acc.qc.edu
Dept of Geology,                                (718) 997-3332
Queens College, City University of New York,    fax:  997-3349
Flushing, NY 11367-1597