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Let's try this again...



A widespread dinosaur plague doesn't neccessarily have to infect every species
to cause mass extinctions.

Here's an example: What would happen to the lions, hyenas, cheetahs, wild dogs,
and leopards of Africa if a new, highly contagious form of Ebola, perhaps like
the airborne strain depicted in "Outbreak," were to tear through the continent,
killing every zebra, gazelle, and wildebeast south of the Sahara? They would
lose their primary prey. The animals who didn't contract the virus from eating
the carcasses would be forced to scavenge for small animals, nothing that could
support a major predator. Eventually they would turn to cannibalism, leading to
extinction.

This would by no means be a worldwide catastrophy, but such an occurance may
have occurred on a much larger scale at the end of the Cretaceous.

This is, of course, entirely speculation.

A.Gwin
uacgwin@cc.memphis.edu