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JOB - VP position at MSU



 CURATOR OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY

         The Michigan State University Museum, a natural and cultural
 history museum, seeks a curator of vertebrate paleontology, to commence by
 August 15, 1997.  This is a joint, 12 month, academic appointment with the
 Department of Geological Sciences (75% Museum/25% Geological Sciences).
 The curator will be responsible for overseeing and enlarging the vertebrate
 paleontology collection, performing research and publication on collection
 materials, generating external funding for collection care and maintaining
 an active research program in vertebrate paleobiology, and participating in
 museum education, exhibition, and public programs.
     Associated duties include curation of a comparative vertebrate skeletal
collection, as well as preserved collections of fishes, amphibians, and
reptiles.  Recent IMS funding is being used to upgrade the care of skeletal and
preserved specimens and computerization of all collections is in progress.
      The curator will direct a graduate student program and teach Vertebrate
Life of the Past in the Department of Geological Sciences and has the option to
 teach graduate courses on a discretionary basis.  The Michigan State
 University Museum strongly interacts with an active, university-wide,
 Interdepartmental Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the
 Paleobiology Group in Geological Sciences.
      Candidates should send a letter of interest that speaks to all of the
elements of the position here described, a vita, and the names and addresses of
three references to: Dr. William Lovis, Chair, Vertebrate Paleontology Search
Committee, MSU Museum, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824,
E-mail: 21299WAL@msu.edu.
      All application materials must be received by February 15, 1997.  Women
and minority candidates are strongly encouraged to apply.

Chris

cnedin@geology.adelaide.edu.au                  nedin@ediacara.org
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Many say it was a mistake to come down from the trees, some say
the move out of the oceans was a bad idea. Me, I say the stiffening
of the notochord in the Cambrian was where it all went wrong,
it was all downhill from there.