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The following is from ScienceScan -- http://www.lava.net.~granahan/news.html

Please send corrections/questions directly to SciencScan

Begin Quote:
VISIT THE TATE MUSEUM ON-LINE

This Wyoming based museum has an on-line exhibit 
collection which includes Tyrannosaurus rex, a 
Wyomingraptor claw, a pleisosaur flipper, an oreodont, and 
some saber-toothed cats. Dr. Bakker has proposed the name 
Wyomingraptor for the new genus of allosaur which was 
found by the Tate Museum in the Morrison Formation at 
Como Bluff, Wyoming.

Go to http://www.cc.whecn.edu/tate/exhibit.htm to visit this 
online exhibit.
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EXPLORE THE CRETACEOUS AGE PALEOASTER 
FRUIT ON-LINE

Palaeoaster is the fruit of an angiosperm (flowering plant) that 
lived in the Western Interior of North America from 77 to 65 
million years ago, disappearing along with the dinosaurs at 
the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. The Palaeoaster plant lived 
on the sandy banks of coastal streams that fed the warm 
subtropical sea covering much of North America during the 
Late Cretaceous. This fossil is larger than any other 
angiosperm fruit of Cretaceous age, and it provides an earliest 
record of several key evolutionary advances in angiosperms 
and is now document on a web site at Yale.

Go to http://pantheonicis.yale.edu/~una/fruit to learn more 
about this fruit.
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VISIT A JAPANESE DINOSAUR PARADISE WEB SITE

The Dinosaur Paradise web site helps give one an asian view 
of the dinosaurs.  This site which is in both Japanese and 
English has descriptions and images of several asian finds 
which include Cretaceous fossils and tracks in the Gobi 
Desert as well as some recent finds of proto-birds in China.  
It also has dinosaur book listings.

Go to 
http://www.vcnet.toyama.toyama.jp/~saurs/sc_index.htm to 
explore dinosaurs from a Japanese view point.