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Re: My Gr. 9 Science Fair Project: Questions



Stephen Throop wrote:
>Edward Traxler wrote:
>
>> [...] The crocs did not bother the
>> little hippo, even when it was shoved by an adult directly into the midst
>> of the crocs.
>
>Perhaps the crocs didn't see the little hippo as food because they'd
>never sampled one.

I think what he's saying is that crocs know not to eat little hippos because
big hippos kill the ones who try.
>
>I understand that when a panther or a shark preys upon a human, the
>authorities try to find and kill that animal because that animal is
>likely to eat other humans.  This implies that dangerous predators
>normally let humans pass because they don't consider humans food.

So what are you saying? That the duckbill authorities would go after any
crocs who ate duckbills? Why don't you jump in a cage with a dangerous
predator and see if it considers you food? Predators often avoid humans
because humans are also dangerous, and there is usually easier prey.
To a Mesozoic croc, a hadrosaur would look like pretty easy prey.

>Similarly, if duckbills were smart enough to avoid becoming part of the
>diet of most crocs, perhaps most crocs didn't go after them.

Steve, you are the ONLY person here who seems to think that hadrosaurs
were "smart enough" to avoid being croc food. They didn't survive by avoiding
predation; they survived by being prolific breeders. This is the way of most
relatively defenseless herbivores.
>
>Past scares with hippos might also encourage crocs to behave.

That was Ed Traxler's point. But hadrosaurs didn't bite adult crocs in half.
PLEASE don't compare them.
>
(Long farm story snipped)

>This led me to speculate that perhaps reptiles learn from mistakes and
>avoid repeating scary confrontations.
>
>Perhaps a croc that once had a scary confrontation with a mother hippo
>would want to avoid starting trouble for the rest of its life.  Perhaps
>there were once crocs who felt that way about duckbills.
>
Steve, give it up! Hadrosaurs WERE NOT A THREAT TO CROCS. Sure, maybe
one stepped on a croc now and then, but that simply means that it didn't see it
in the first place.  Remember who's the predator, and who's the prey!

Now, can we give it a rest?

Wayne Anderson