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Fwd: [Fwd: Re: NOVA]



In a message dated 97-03-04 22:33:18 EST, millerm@thunder.indstate.edu
(Michael D. Miller) writes:

<< It certainly may be true, and some private owners just may do that, but 
 it is not REQUIRED by any law that they do.  It must be by thier good 
 nature that they would if they did and it seems the mindset, although 
 negative, that most private collectors would not let people in to examine 
 their collection, even the most highly trained.  The chances for a 
 scientist to study a specimen through a museum is much higher than 
 through a private collector.  What I am saying is that private collectors 
 tend to be less flexible to the sensitivies of scientists and more 
 concerned with issues which are more centered around their whims.
 
 Michael D. Miller >>
I don't agree with the assertion that most collectors will not allow
qualified persons reasonable access to their material. In fact I find that
with private collectors, just the opposite is true. Most of the ones I know
have allowed professionals to see their stuff, have loaned  specimens and
donated many. In thinking about the collectors I know and trying to put
numbers on it, probably 4 out of 5 I know fit into the donor vs. the hoarder
category. True, they are not in the business of sending parts of collections
out to be studied all the time. For a private collector holding down a job to
support a family, this may be too much to ask for on a regular basis. So to
that extent they may be less flexible. 

And yes, whatever they do they do voluntarily. They are not being forced to
do anything by a law or organizational policy, so anyone wishing to see their
material may have to use some people skills and patience. And yes, it is
easier through a museum. And yes,  both sides have horror stories to tell. 

And yes, collectors donate their personal time to locating and collecting
fossils, that the skilled scientist can have access to.

Gene Hartstein

---------------------
Forwarded message:
From:   millerm@thunder.indstate.edu (Michael D. Miller)
Sender: owner-dinosaur@usc.edu
Reply-to:       millerm@thunder.indstate.edu
To:     FOSSILNUT@AOL.COM
CC:     dinosaur@usc.edu
Date: 97-03-04 22:33:18 EST

>I too see nothing wrong with a "foreign" museum getting Sue but the 
assertion
>that possession by a private collector automatically means it will be
>unavailable to science is an allegation. It is in the best interests of an
>owner to make extremely rare and important finds available to professionals
>for proper documentation, if for no other reason than to increase it's 
value.


It certainly may be true, and some private owners just may do that, but 
it is not REQUIRED by any law that they do.  It must be by thier good 
nature that they would if they did and it seems the mindset, although 
negative, that most private collectors would not let people in to examine 
their collection, even the most highly trained.  The chances for a 
scientist to study a specimen through a museum is much higher than 
through a private collector.  What I am saying is that private collectors 
tend to be less flexible to the sensitivies of scientists and more 
concerned with issues which are more centered around their whims.

Michael D. Miller