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Books and refs [was Re: Sitting down., The Dinosauria?, and new refs]



        I'm a (message) lumper today:
E Summer wrote:
>So the question is, what did they look like sitting? How did they sit?
>Is anyone aware of "sitting" portraits?
        Paul, G. S. 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World.

Larry Dunn wrote:
>Is a new, revised edition of The Dinosauria expected/in the 
>works/whatever?  I want to buy, but not a 
>soon-to-be-rendered-obsolete edition.
        I have yet to meet a dinosaur publication which was not obsolete
before it was published. Don't let this stop you. Owning a copy of the
Dinosauria is like no other pleasure in amateur paleontology. Even if they
were to put out a new edition (and I doubt they will, after the ammount of
effort which obviously to have gone into the first one, my guess is
everyone'd be better off if they just wrote a new book), the old one is a
classic, bedtime reading for a month, the ultimate answer for many
questions, the amateur's (and I suppose professional's) dream. Have I made
myself perfectly clear? Buy it now! :)

Mikiel wrote (delightfully, I might add):
>dinosaur: Any chiefly terrestrial, herbivorous, or carnivorous animal of
>the extinct orders Ornithischia or Saurischia, from the Mesozoic era.
        Note that, despite this being the hoary old Websters(?) definition,
it is approximately accurate phylogenetically (although it is not a
phylogenetic definition). Novas (1996) defines Dinosauria as most recent
common ancestor of Saurischia and Ornithiscia and all of its decendants. Hee
hee hee.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Jonathan R. Wagner, Dept. of Geosciences, TTU, Lubbock TX 79409
      "The cost of living hasn't affected its popularity." - Unknown