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Teeth



Teeth

   From the recent discussions on teeth, it would seem that this is an
area that someone could specialize in.  Almost every article I read on
dinosaur discoveries mentions some type of theropod teeth.  It would be
helpful if you could readily look up teeth types found and identify the
general type of dinosaurs from an area.  Likewise, teeth sifters could
pass on information on specific small teeth found to someone specifically
working in this area.  Knowing where teeth were located could also be
useful in identifying the types of dinosaurs from a specific region.
Useful information is often found by footprints - such as the possibility
of larger animals from those known.  Likewise, large teeth might indicate
that there are possibly larger or smaller species than already found.
   Questions abound.  What happens to dinosaur teeth found by mammal
hunters?  Were there any small theropods at the KT boundary?  Were small
theropods as numerous as small mammals based on teeth finds?  Can teeth be
used to age dinosaurs?  Would the presence of teeth over the ages help
identify the relationship of dinosaurs?  Would a look at the change in
ornithopod teeth show how they evolved over time?  Would the evolution and
type of teeth indicate the type of vegetation eaten? Are there teeth out
there for which we have no known dinosaur?
   With replaceable teeth, they should be fairly common.  The hard part is
finding out about their prevalence.   Full scale diagrams with cross
sections could be produced that would act as a great field guide,
especially for non dinosaur paleontologists.
   Is there anyone working is the area?
        Mark Shelly