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Another New Book, etc.



 The Smithsonian Institution Press has just issued "Discovering Dinosaurs in
 the Old West" (198 pages; $24.95).  Book is a compendium of Arthur Lakes'
 field journals covering his discovery of the Morrison Ridge fossil deposits
 and subsequent work at Como Bluff.  The field journals were thought to be
 lost until "rediscovered" in the Smithsonian collections in 1994.  Editors
 Michael F. Kohl and John S. McIntosh add some nice sidebars on peripheral
 events/places (the Ute War, Florissant Fossil Beds, a train robbery alluded
 to in the journal) and biographical sketches (Mudge and Reed).  Two dozen
 sketches and watercolors (unfortunately in black and white) made by Lakes
are
 scattered throughout the text.
 
 Just on the off-chance that other history-of-vert-paleo buffs might have
 missed it, there's a slightly obscure book entitled "An Agenda for
Antiquity:
  Henry Fairfield Osborn and Vertebrate Paleontology at the American Museum
of
 Natural History, 1890-1935" by Ronald Rainger (Tuscaloosa:  University of
 Alabama Press, 1991), 360 pp. (including 17 photos).  Sorry:  price isn't
 printed on the book and I don't recall what I paid -- which was highly
 discounted, as I purchased through a discount mail-order service); however,
 you can probably access such info at www.amazon.com.
 
 If anyone is aware of other recent and obscure publications on
 similar subjects, I'd appreciate the heads-up.
 
 A couple of web heads-ups....D.T. King, Jr.'s "Alabama Dinosaurs" (Auburn:
  Auburn University Custom Publishing, 1996 [2nd ed.]) is extensively
 summarized (printout = more than 40 pages) at
 www.auburn.edu/~kingdat/index.html.
 
 http://members.aol.com/fossiltime/index.html is a webpage on North Dakota
 Paleontology put out by Johnathan Campbell, the preparator for the North
 Dakota Geological Survey.  It features lots of pictures including one of a
 large champsosaur mount and the promise of more info in the future on this
 Cretaceous/Paleocene reptile -- an interesting footnote to the recent posts
 about Paleocene dinosaurs.
 

 Keith Manasco  
 
 
 
---------------------
Forwarded message:
From:   mrowe@indiana.edu (Mickey P. Rowe)
To:     JManasco@aol.com
Date: 97-09-18 17:40:38 EDT


Due to some bizarre snafu at AOL you were removed from the dinosaur
mailing list yesterday; I added you back on since the error message
made it seem clear that the problem was temporary.  I was expecting
you'd never know about it unless you happened to notice that there was
some mail you didn't get today.  However, the message I'm including
below came to the list during the time that you weren't subscribed.
Listproc bounced it to me because it won't accept mail from
non-subscribers.  If you wouldn't mind, could you forward the
following back to dinosaur@usc.edu ?

Thanks and sorry for the inconvenience,

Mickey

---------------------------
Subject: Yet Another New Book 

The Smithsonian Institution Press has just issued "Discovering Dinosaurs in
the Old West" (198 pages; $24.95).  Book is a compendium of Arthur Lakes'
field journals covering his discovery of the Morrison Ridge fossil deposits
and subsequent work at Como Bluff.  The field journals were thought to be
lost until "rediscovered" in the Smithsonian collections in 1994.  Editors
Michael F. Kohl and John S. McIntosh add some nice sidebars on peripheral
events/places (the Ute War, Florissant Fossil Beds, a train robbery alluded
to in the journal) and biographical sketches (Mudge and Reed).  Two dozen
sketches and watercolors (unfortunately in black and white) made by Lakes are
scattered throughout the text.

Just on the off-chance that other history-of-vert-paleo buffs might have
missed it, there's a slightly obscure book entitled "An Agenda for Antiquity:
 Henry Fairfield Osborn and Vertebrate Paleontology at the American Museum of
Natural History, 1890-1935" by Ronald Rainger (Tuscaloosa:  University of
Alabama Press, 1991), 360 pp. (including 17 photos).  Sorry:  price isn't
printed on the book and I don't recall what I paid -- which was highly
discounted, as I purchased through a discount mail-order service); however,
you can probably access such info at www.amazon.com.

Finally, if anyone is aware of other recent and obscure publications on
similar subjects, I'd appreciate the heads-up.

A couple of web heads-ups....D.T. King, Jr.'s "Alabama Dinosaurs" (Auburn:
 Auburn University Custom Publishing, 1996 [2nd ed.]) is extensively
summarized (printout = more than 40 pages) at
www.auburn.edu/~kingdat/index.html.

http://members.aol.com/fossiltime/index.html is a webpage on North Dakota
Paleontology put out by Johnathan Campbell, the preparator for the North
Dakota Geological Survey.  It features lots of pictures including one of a
large champsosaur mount and the promise of more info in the future on this
Cretaceous/Paleocene reptile -- an interesting footnote to the recent posts
about Paleocene dinosaurs.

Somewhat off-subject....www.beringia.com offers extensive info on the late
Pleistocene scene on webpage associated with the new Yukon Beringia
Interpretive Center.  You'll want to go by when you're in the neighborhood.  

Keith Manasco