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Re: Those Clumsy Ol' Therapods!



It's gratifying to see other media pick this story up, but the original
source is New Scientist. (I know, since I wrote it.) It should be on our
web site, listed in my signature below, but I haven't had time to check
since I got home from the Dinofest symposium late last night. There will be
two more stories up when London posts next week's issues (one of which I
need to finish writing).

To clarify my story and the pickup reports a bit, Bruch Rothschild found
that allosaurus cracked its upper one or two ribs, consistent with falling
flat, then got up, a bit the worse for wear, dusted itself off, and went
home so those sore ribs could heal and show up in X rays 150 million years
later. Jim Farlow says the larger T. rex might not have survived to get up
and recover. For the full story I wrote, see the New Scientist web site.
(And an apology -- Bruce told me about it on the phone before Dinofest, but
didn't actually mention allosaurus in his talk at the symposium.) -- Jeff
Hecht

>*** Dinosaurs took tumbles while hunting - magazine
>
>Some big dinosaurs often tripped and broke their ribs while chasing
>their prey, New Scientist magazine said Thursday. Bruce Rothschild of
>the Arthritis Center of Northeast Ohio in Youngstown studied the
>family of two-legged dinosaurs known as Therapods, which includes the
>deadly Tyrannosaurus rex. He X-rayed fossil skeletons and found that
>ribs from some specimens of a smaller species known as Allosaurus
>showed the kind of fractures that would have been caused by a belly
>flop on to hard ground while running. See
>http://www.infobeat.com/stories/cgi/story.cgi?id=2553759482-a1c


Jeff Hecht     Boston Correspondent    New Scientist magazine
525 Auburn St.,          Auburndale, MA 02166             USA
tel 617-965-3834 fax 617-332-4760 e-mail jhecht@world.std.com
URL: http://www.sff.net/people/Jeff.Hecht/
see New Scientist on the Web: http://www.newscientist.com/