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Re: LOOKIN' FOR MONSTERS IN ALL THE WRONG PLACES



Read my earlier post again. I don't believe a living
plesiosaur was
mentioned... 
        It is important to note that paradigms exist in our minds and that
getting caught in their confines can inhibit good research. Be it in a
desert hunting fossils, 20,000 leagues under the sea searching for new
species, or on other planetary environs searching for aminos and such.
        Craigs original questions (RE:Survival) make for some interesting
speculation. I don't believe they called for dissenting opinions on the
existence of (ooh, can I say it..?) a living plesiosaur in the Loch Ness
of Scotland. If a lobe-finned ceolocanth survives in the deep sea, can't a
terrestrial species survive in a small area, with a small breeding
population, over millions of years... This is cryptozoology stuff here and
I apologize to the list, yet an important message is being brought to the
table. After reading many of the responses to the Survival thread, I
noticed more than a hint of sarcasm in several of the responses.
Speculation is after all just that. Is it so wrong to have fun with the
idea, viable or not? Don't be afraid to give a simple opinion...jeesh!
  
Incoming!!!

Chad Laibly

 On Sat, 1
Aug 1998, Brian Franczak wrote:

> C. Laibly wrote:
>  
> > Ceolocanth..........
> > 1. No recent fossil record.
> > 2. Small surviving population
> > 3. Considered an "impossible" survivor until recently...
> > 
> > I am inclined to think Nessie is mostly hype, yet there are
> > undiscovered and unusual organisms out there. Architeuthis Dux, Komodo
> > Dragon, Jurassic trees, Megamouth Shark! A vietnamese antelope with   > 
> > nose slits along the muzzle! I think these images have alot to say     > 
> > about keeping an open mind towards Craig's original questions. Though > I 
> > wouldn't go Nessie hunting tomorrow, I WOULD stare at deep sea      > 
> > cameras searching for a 100ft squid, or search for the God bear in     > 
> > Siberia.
> 
> What NO ONE who wants to believe in "Nessie" seems to realize is that if
> "Nessie" were indeed a plesiosaur, IT'S AN AIR-BREATHING ANIMAL, NOT A
> FISH! YOU'D BE ABLE TO SPOT THEM ON THE SURFACE EVERY TIME THEY CAME UP
> FOR AIR! HOW HARD IS THAT?! Since there can't be less than a breeding
> population (unless you want to believe the coincidence that they're just
> now going extinct while we're looking for them), then it would seem to
> me it'd be pretty easy.
> 
> Brian (franczak@ntplx.net)
> http://www.paleolife-art.com
>