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Re: Son of the Murderous Digit



Dastardly Dan Varner, in his nefarious way, seems to keep wanting to get me
started about this damn digit!  Briefly, the 
seriema in Knight's drawing is shown as a normal tridactyl bird/dinosaur. 
The toe in question is short, has a big
claw and is flat on the ground just like the other two toes.  The seriema
is shown at rest, standing still.  But while back
East, I did notice that the foot on the Velociraptor statue at the AMNH is
also tridactyl, flat on the ground on one foot and raising slightly on the
other foot as it is being lifted.  To sum up (again) my beef has only been
the depiction of this toe PULLED ALL THE WAY UP AND BACK, actually pressed
against the metatarsal, NO MATTER WHAT POSITION THE LEG AND FOOT ARE IN.  
This is what seems wrong to me.  Now, let's you and Dan fight.

----------
> From: Danvarner@aol.com
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Son of the Murderous Digit
> Date: Monday, August 10, 1998 1:34 PM
> 
>   Many thanks to Rich Travsky (hope I'm spelling your name correctly) for
> recommending bibliofind.com. I managed to acquire a previously unknown
book by
> Charles R.Knight and his sister-in-law, Ella Hardcastle, _Birds of the
World
> for Young People_, 1909, Fred Stokes, N.Y. Although there are many
plates,
> only two, in black and white, are by Knight- pencil drawings. One of the
birds
> depicted by Knight is a crested seriema with the "dromaeosaurian" digit
#2 in
> all its glory. This is as close as we will ever get to a Knight
dromaeosaur or
> troodont.
>   My question to the list is: how is this digit utilized by the seriema
in its
> day-to-day business and (this is probably something for Dr. Farlow) what
do
> the ichnites of this taxon look like? 
>   I showed the Knight drawing to Von Sholly recently and he just beamed
with
> delight. Dan Varner.