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Re: CORRELATIVE AND CAUSITIVE SCIENCE WHEN DEALING WITH EXTINCTION SCENARIOS




Tetanurae@aol.com wrote: Another thing I would like to point out to everyone is
the size of the rock

> that fell from the sky.  Get a globe, your standard American 12" diameter
> globe will be fine for my example.  I have heard estimates of the size of this
> rock from between 6 and 10 miles across.  That means that with the 12" globe
> the rock that killed the dinosaurs would be between 1/110 and 1/66 of an
> inch!!!  This is bordering on microscopic.
>
> And this tiny partical of dust is supposed to kick up enough dust and rock to
> cloud up the atmosphere, block out the sun, then bake the earth enough to
> cause massive firestorms!?  Give me a break!  Am the only one that thinks that
> this is just slightly absurd?

Compared to the size of the earth, it WAS a tiny particle.  Let's see.....
Conservatively, using the small diameter, a SpG of 2.65 (just rock, no 
nickle/iron
core), and figuring a middling approach velocity of 20 miles per second --- 
that's
about 1.38 times ten to the twelth tons hitting us at over 105,000 feet per
second.  We're lucky to be here.

On a similar note, we seem to have been  hit once before with a bigger rock, one
about twice the size of Mars.  The earth appears to have melted all the way to 
the
core.  Had there been life on earth at the time, would that have been impact
enough to cause extinctions?

Cheers,
Jim