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RE: [Re: polar sauropods]




> -----Original Message-----
> From: archosaur@usa.net [SMTP:archosaur@usa.net]
> Sent: Saturday, December 05, 1998 1:01 PM
> To:   dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject:      Re: [Re: polar sauropods]
> 
>  
> 
> ====================================================
> =====================================================
> 
> Turtles are the most climatically flexible (possible neologism here?) of
> all
> of todays reptiles with the marine turtles _Caretta caretta_ and
> _Dermochelys
> coriacea_ holding the record for coldest temperatures.
> 
> _Caretta caretta_ lives up in the temperate waters of the atlantic as far
> up
> as Maine and _Dermochelys coriacea_ makes frequent trips to the arctic
> ocean
> in search of jellyfish.
> 
> _D.coriacea_ withstands the cold by having lots of fatty layers surounding
> it's body. In a word, it has blubber. It's actually quite interesting to
> take
> a look at the anatomical makeup of a leatherback. They may be turtles, but
> their built like whales.
> 
> If one goes back a couple million years then one can find the terrestrial
> testudines, the Meiolaniids, living in the Antarctic.
> 
> Turtles just don't make for good temperature indicators.
> 
> Archosaur J
> 
        [Stewart, Dwight]  #################################################


        On that subject, blubber seems like a fine adaptation to deal with
colder temperature.
        Any thoughts on the liklihood that sauropods (or other dinosaurs)
might have used
        blubber (or at least adipose tissue) to deal with colder
temperatures?

        Dwight