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New refs #27



And another set for today. Sitting around listening to Reggae awaiting a 
long-needed vacation in Jamaica to start soon. By the way, the missing date on 
the Geister from last list was 1998.

First a new pterosaur...

Buffetaut, E., J.-J. Lepage & G. Lepage. 1998. A new
   Pterodactyloid pterosaur from the Kimmeridgian of
   The Cap de la Heve (Normandy, France). Geol.
   Mag., 135(5):719-722.

Jaw bits from the Upper Jurassic of Normandy.  Named Normannognathus 
wellnhoferi - the jaw from Normandy named for Peter W.

Now the awaited...

Taquet, P. & D.A. Russell. 1998. New data on spinosaurid
   Dinosaurs from the Early Cretaceous of the Sahara.
   C.R. Acad. Sci., Paris, Sci. de la Terre et des Planetes,
   327:347-353.

The main competition for Sereno in African spinosaurids. Very scrappy material. 
Taquet is a very nice guy and I can highly recommend his new book.


Shishkin, M.A. 1998. Tungussogyrinus - a relict neotenic
   Dissorophid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the 
   Permo-Triassic of Siberia. Paleontological J., 32(5):521-531.

The title pretty much says it all. Redescription of old material with some new 
stuff.

Now a title that might be of interest to those interested in the limbs of dinos 
and how their musculature worked.


Patak, A.E. & J. Baldwin. 1998. Pelvic limb musculature in the
   Emu Dromaius novaehollandiae (Aves: Struthioniformes:
   Dromaiidae): adaptations to high-speed running.
   Journal of Morphology, 238:23-37.

Nice anatomical stuff. Very muscular.


Li, L & G. Keller. 1998. Abrupt deep-sea warming at the end
   Of the Cretaceous. Geology, 26(11):995-998.

Describes a warm pulse right before the end of the Cretaceous. Might also be 
relevant to K/T extinctions.


Retallack, G. et al. (5 others). 1998. Search for evidence of
   impact at the Permian-Triassic boundary in Antarctica and
   Australia. Geology, 26(11):979-982.

Some evidence of an impact but it suggests a minor one and, perhaps, mis-timed 
with the actual extinction. No real evidence for a major impact here.


Molnar, R.E., J. Wiffen & B. Hayes. 1998. A probable
   Theropod bone from the latest Jurassic of New Zealand.
   New Zealand J. Geology & Geophysics, 41:145-148.

Pretty darned scrappy bone piece that still may suggest that dinos were in NZ 
from at least the late Jurassic to the end of the Cretaceous.


Rage, J.-C. 1998. Latest Cretaceous extinctions and
   environmental sex determination in reptiles. Bull.
   Soc. Geol. France, 169(4):479-483.

Discounts ESD as a cause of extinction at the KT.


Warren, A. & C. Marsicano. 1998. Revision of the
   Brachyopidae (Temnospondyli) from the Triassic
   Of the Sydney, Carnarvon and Tasmania Basins,
   Australia. Alcheringa, 22:329-342.

Nice review.


Mukherjee, R.N. & D.P. Sengupta. 1998. New
   Capitosaurid amphibians from the Triassic Denwa
   Formation of the Satpura Gondwana Basin, central
   India. Alcheringa, 22:317-327.

Another nice review - good time for Triassic amphibs. New long-snouted amphib 
genus Parotosuchus. Heads are 12-15" long. Nice.

Natur und Museum 128(7) 1998 has two nice articles on the Messel fauna - and 
Germany has a nice new postage stamp with a Messel croc on it.


Thomas, D.A. 1998. Gaps in the fossil record: a case study.
   Skeptical Inquirer, 22(6)[Nov/Dec]:26-28.

Uses the Morrison Formation to discuss gaps in the record.

That's it for now.

Ralph Chapman, NMNH