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Re: Deinosuchus basics




On Mon, 2 Feb 1998, chris brochu wrote:

> >Tom asked the dinosaur:
> >
> >>Exactly how big was Deinosuchus?Did it live in salt or fresh water?
> >
> >I am trying to find out that myself.  What I have learned so far is that it
> >was probably around 12m, not 15m as some sources suggest.  Several other
> >Mesozoic crocodylians (formerly known as crocodilians) were about the same
> >length, none larger.
> 
> (Please forgive my being an anal person for a moment)
> 
> Actually, most of the big Mesozoic crocodyliforms were not crocodylians at
> all.  Crocodylia is strictly defined as the last common ancestor of living
> gavials, alligators, and crocodiles, and all of its descendents.  Nearly
> all Mesozoic crocodyliforms fall outside this group, and would be
> non-crocodylian crocodyliforms.  This includes Sarcosuchus, which was
> likely the largest of all time.
> 
> Within the crown-group, there's Deinosuchus and, in the Tertiary,
> Rhamphosuchus (a really big gavialoid) and Purussaurus (a giant caiman),
> all of which were *probably* in the 30 to 40 foot range.
> 
> 
> 
> >
> >Deinosuchus is known from freshwater deposits
> 
> Estuarine in western Texas.

...and possibly from the Late Cretaceous of North Carolina

---John Schneiderman (dino@revelation.unomaha.edu)