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Re: Brainiest dinosaur ?




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> From: Matt <mss196@soton.ac.uk>
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Brainiest dinosaur ?
> Date: Monday, February 09, 1998 6:26 AM
> 
> 
> > It was obviously of the flying variety. After all, THEY didn't manage
> > to become extinct.
> > Seriously (?), the size of the brain occupying a fossil skull is not
> > always known for sure, since the brain may not have been totally
> > surrounded by bone during life and measurements of a cranian cavity
> > may therefore yield over-estimations of gross brain size. To add to
> > this, the size of the brain is not necessarily a good 
> > indicator of intelligence. Miniature varieties of dog are
> > no less intelligent than great Danes or St Bernards. The complexity
> > of the brain also counts, as does which parts of the brain dominate
> > (large cererbal cortex may indicate intelligence). A large brain
> > may have been made up of particularly well developed sensory lobes
> > with little in the way of a cerebral cortex, making the creature in
> > question good at seeing, smelling or hearing, but I wouldn't bother
> > challenging it to a game of chess.
> > To sum up (and perhaps this would have sufficed): no-one knows for
> > sure.
> > -- 
> > ____________________________________________________
> >     Dann Pigdon
> >     Melbourne, Australia
> > 
> >     Dinosaur Reconstructions:
> >     http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/4459/
> >     Australian Dinosaurs:
> >     http://www.alphalink.com.au/~dannj
> > ____________________________________________________
> 
> 
> I don't know if this might have any use, but ever niticed 
> that those little dogs, all they do it eat sleep and attack! 
> While larger dogs (excluding the varieties bred to be 
> aggressive) can often display an apparently wider range of 
> emotions, like overprotectiveness of it's owners, and even 
> affection. I could be biased against the little dogs, 
> admittedly. I see no point in them.
> 
> ----------------------
> Matt
> mss196@soton.ac.uk

You've obviously never had dachshunds.