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Re: Dinosaur extinction



In article <Pine.OSF.3.95q.980219195713.7203D-100000@tracy.umd.edu>,
John Bois <jbois@umd5.umd.edu> writes
>
>
>On Wed, 18 Feb 1998 Dinogeorge@aol.com wrote:
>
>> The biggest problem with extinction theories is that they simply cannot be
>> confirmed. One cannot run an experiment with control groups and so forth, so
>> one is left with "maybe this" and "maybe that."... Might as well save
>> your breath.

Well, might as well look for testable quincequonces of the theories.
Insofar as there are any.  Some consequences have been invented and
observed. 

>
>An honest question: Wouldn't Darwin's Natural Selection hypothesis at the
>time he proposed it fall under this view?
>
>
No.  Try reading "The Beak of the Finch" sometime, after the "Origin of
Species".  Natural selection was supported by rather little evidence in
Darwin's time - it was an ingenious speculation.  But it was testable
and has been tested. 

talk.origins is probably the right place to ask this kind of question,
btw. I won't prolong this thread here. 

-- 
Richard Keatinge 

homepage http://www.keatinge.demon.co.uk