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Re: Mammal - Like - Reptiles ... info needed.



Jonkeria@aol.com wrote:

> Dave, in a message dated 98-02-23 01:03:40 EST, wrote:
>
> << I would definitely recommend John McLoughlin's book _Synapsida_, which is
>  regretably out-of-print, but should be at a local library.>>
>
> There is of course _The Ecology and Biology of the Mammal-like Reptiles_
> edited by Nicholas Hotton III and published by Smithsonian Institution Press,
> but it is hard to get and very expensive (and even now just a tad dated.).

To this and the others listed in this thread, I'd like to add two more:

    IN THE SHADOW OF THE DINOSAURS: EARLY MESOZOIC TETRAPODS
    Nicholas Fraser and Hans-Dieter Sues (ed.)
    c. 1995, Cambridge University Press

This is a collection of 25 journal-quality articles on Triassic and Early 
Jurassic
non-dinosaur tetrapods, including both late therapsids and early mammals.

    "Synapsid Evolution and the Radiation of Non-Eutherian Mammals"
    James A. Hopson
    Article in MAJOR FEATURES OF VERTEBRATE EVOLUTION
    Short Course #7 from The Paleontological Society

This is an article on therapsid and early mammal evolution and relationships, 
with
the most up-to-date information known in 1994.

Also, Dave, you asked specifically about _Lystrosaurus_.  Besides being a
synapsid, _Lystrosaurus_ has an entire separate facet to its history: it was one
of the staple pieces of fossil evidence for continental drift, back when that
theory was a spittoon for American paleontologists and geologists.  When Ned
Colbert found _Lystrosaurus_ distributed across southwestern Africa, 
southeastern
South America, _and_ bits of Antarctica, it was the clearest proof possible that
all those landmasses were once connected, and not by any measly land bridges.

-- Jon W.