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Re: theropod sunglasses?



   You read my mind exactly.  Not only do cheetahs have the 
characteristic black stripe under the eye, but many birds do as well ( 
Peregrine falcon, for instance.)  Actually, I recently finished a 
drawing depicting an Allosaurus fragilis brandishing this decor.

-  Jordan Mallon


>From owner-dinosaur@usc.edu Sat Jul  4 00:04:35 1998
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>From: Dann Pigdon <dannj@alphalink.com.au>
>To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>Subject: Re: theropod sunglasses?
>References: <19980701163053.9187.qmail@hotmail.com>
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>Jordan Mallon wrote:
>> 
>>    Hi everyone,
>> 
>>    I'm new here, so don't bite.
>>    I am rather surprised I haven't heard this before, ( has it been
>> mentioned?) but I think the big hornlets above the eyes if the large
>> theropods ( Allosaurus, Carnotaurus, etc...) could have been used to
>> block out the Mesozoic sun.  Today's sidewinder snake has adopted
>> similar protrusions above its eyes and they seem to do just fine at
>> protecting the eyes from the sun.  Does anyone think this is a valid
>> idea?
>> 
>
>Absolutely. I would go one step further. Cheetahs (which hunt primarily
>during the day) have black markings around their eyes to help cut
>down on glare. Perhaps we should see more life restorations of 
theropods
>with obvious orbital/nasal ridges and black markings below the eyes.
>Incidently it seems that humans are aware of the usefullnesss of such
>markings, as used by American football players.
>
>Orbital horns may not have always served this purpose though.
>Carnotaurus had quite pronounced horns, but pathetically tiny eyes.
>I'm sure that protection from other head butting/swinging theropods
>and that old favourite display also played a significant role in the
>development of ridges and hornlets on theropod skulls. Which is the
>secondary purpose remains to be seen.
>-- 
>____________________________________________________
>       Dann Pigdon
>       Melbourne, Australia
>
>       Dinosaur Reconstructions:
>       http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/4459/
>       Australian Dinosaurs:
>       http://www.alphalink.com.au/~dannj
>____________________________________________________
>


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