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Re: [Re: Resting Sauropods]



owner-dinosaur@usc.edu wrote:
> 
>  Brian Franczak wrote: 
> 
> [snipped]
> 
> > Depictions of theropods and ceratopians
> > reclining cat-like/cow-like on their sides have always bothered me for
> > this reason, since without lumbar vertebrae, I wouldn't have thought
> > that position possible for them. Comments?
> > 
> > Brian (franczak@ntplx.net)
> > http://www.paleolife-art.com

> 
> I always understood that, because of their weight, elephants couldn't 
> lie down on their side for very long because the pressure on their 
> organs and intestines would become too great. Similar stresses in 
> sauropods must have been enormous.
> 
> Ilja Nieuwland
> 
>

====================================
=========================================

Actually with todays advancements in video
technology we've been able to find out that elephants
can stand long periods on their sides. An episode of 
Nature was done using infared cameras. It showed a herd
of elephants spending the night all clumped together and 
all lying on their sides. They are supposedly sleep for three
whole hours a day (which is a lot for a herbivore) and were
seen in deep sleep. So much so that many of them were snoring.

Even though the elephant analogy keeps getting pushed to
it's limits here, I can almost believe sauropods that 
sleep on their sides. It's just that I don't know of many reptiles
 (including birds) that sleep on their sides.

Archosaur J
 
> 


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