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GARGOYLEOSAURUS AND GRASSLANDS



The subjects are not related to eachother:

GARGOYLEOSAURUS
The skull of this new Ankylosaur is neat, one thing though.  I believe that
the species name is declined incorrectly.  As of now, it is _Gargoyleosaurus
parkpini_, but according to the etymology, the specific name is: "for J.
Parker and T. Pinegar.."

Since the specific name honors two indiviuals, shouldn't it be _G.
parkpinorum_.  Am I wrong?

GRASSLANDS (OR THE LACK THEREOF)
Of course during the Mesozoic, there were no grasslands since there was no
grass.  That does not mean that there necisarily was widespread surface
erossion.  Keep in mind that there were other plants around during the
Mesozoic that could have held in soils.  During the later part of the
Cretaceous, angiosperm "weeds" were probably everywhere, filling meadows much
the same as grass and "weeds" do today.  Prior to that ferns, mosses, ground
pines etc could have filled the same niche.

Peter Buchholz
Tetanurae@aol.com

Mare a ja wana's baaad