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Re: Embryos known?



Jeff Poling <jpoling@dinosauria.com> wrote
>  What dinosaur
>embryos have been found other than from Troodon (originally thought to be
>from Orodromeus)?  --(Short enough snip, MR?)--

Gautam Majumdar has mentioned _Morosaurus_. 
I would add:

_Maiasaura_
_Hypacrosaurus_
_Oviraptor_

A good many dinosaur embryos are currently being prepared and studied, but
the above list may be all the embryo types currently attributable to a
particular genus.  Anybody know of others which have been positively
identified? 

In addition to the above, many theropod (suspected therizinosaur) embryos
have been found in eggs from China.  Terry Manning of Leicester, England,
was using acid to slowly remove the matrices of 60 eggs at the time of the
May 1996 _National Geographic_ feature story on fossil eggs, _The Great
Dinosaur Egg Hunt_.  He was guessing that the collection under
investigation represented perhaps three distinct dinosaur species.  One of
the embryos he prepared was the basis for a Brian Cooley model in the
_National Geographic_ article; another Cooley model was based on a theropod
embryo dubbed "Baby Louie," which came from the _Macroelongatoolithus
xixianensis_ oospecies (egg species, not yet identified with a particular
species of dinosaur).

Surgeon Martin Shugar of Hollywood, Florida, who uses CT scanners to study
dinosaur embryos still inside unprepared fossil eggs, has detected
embryonic material inside many unhatched eggs, but "in significant amounts
only in 25 percent of the eggs."  So it would appear that fossilized
dinosaur embryos are not so uncommon in _intact, unhatched_ eggs.  But for
the embryos to be so complete and well preserved (and so carefully
prepared) that they can be identified with a particular species (or even
genus) is apparently quite rare (so far).

I highly recommend a trip to <www.nationalgeographic.com/dinoeggs/>.  The
free online articles are full of photographs and insights, and go into even
more detail than _The Great Dinosaur Egg Hunt_ magazine article.  

-- Ralph Miller III     gbabcock@best.com