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Re: "Dinosaurs don't count"



In a message dated 4/21/99 9:31:27 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
Dinogeorge@aol.com writes:

<< In human societies, the term "important" is tightly intertwined with 
"wealth 
 increase," because the >most important thing< to the >vast majority< of 
 humans is how wealthy they are, that is, how powerful they are relative to 
 other humans that they might encounter and how free their wealth may make 
 them from the "daily grind."  >>

What is more important to a species than what encourages or discourages 
survival?  Your definition exaggerates because it assumes superfluity is most 
desired.  Most parents want their kids to be happy and eventually able to 
support themselves.  The computer is currently the magic bullet:  if you want 
to earn a living learn computers.  (Like most magic bullets, this one will 
probably shatter:  I expect much programming will be done by computer on 
request of someone who lays out the logic, by voice.)  If dinosaurs were a 
viable option for many as a career path, that would lead to intense 
seriousness.  Because not too many people can earn their living by studying 
dinosaurs, they become part of happiness/leisure.  In that sense, the 
Jurassic Park movies are good for business, because they increase the number 
of people (in making movies, anyway) who can be paid for knowledge of 
dinosaurs.
Tough to fault people for a reasonable attitude about the next generation.  
My problem is with those who don't understand the reason for higher education 
itself, aside from job training.  Problem solving does not come without 
training, and the training has to start with what people can comprehend.  So, 
for example, most people can read.  English can be used to teach about 
problem solving because the basics (words) are easily comprehensible.  There 
are other fields where the subject matter is hard AND the logic difficult and 
the details numerous, such as paleontology.  I don't believe that those are 
as easy gateways to an active mind.
I know, spoken like an English major.