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New refs #32



Some more stuff has arisen from my stratigraphical desk.

Some detailed work on Mesozoic climates of England, nice and comprehensive...

Allen, P. (comp.) 1998. Purbeck - Wealden (Early
   Cretaceous) climates. Proc. Geologist's Assoc.,
   109:197-236.

Next an important historical pub that came here recently even though it has a 
1995 print date. A good one for lots of us to know about...

Zils, W., C. Werner, A. Moritz & C. Saanane. 1995.
   Tendaguru, the most famous dinosaur locality of
   Africa. Review, Survey and future prospects.
   Documenta Naturae No. 97. 41 p. 17 pl.

And now a nice study of basal ichthyosaurian relationships. Motani is 
incredibly bright.

Motani, R., N. Minoura & T. Ando. 1998. Ichthyosaurian
   Relationships illuminated by new primitive skeletons
   From Japan. Nature, 393:255-257. 21MAY98

Lots about the basal form Utatsusaurus.

Buffetaut, E. & J. Le Loeuff. 1998. A new giant ground
   Bird from the Upper Cretaceous of southern France.
   J. geol. Soc. London, 155:1-4.

New taxon Gargantuavis philoinos. Big and reprensented by pelvic elements and 
femur. Shows large flightless birds didn't just fill empty niches of non-avian 
dinos.


Now a detailed analysis of the sedimentology of Two Medicine and Judith River 
formations of Montana. Ray is outstanding at determining the taphonomic and 
paleoecologic settings of where our dinos come from. Nice guy too.

Rogers, R.R. 1998. Sequence analysis of the Upper
   Cretaceous Two Medicine and Judith River Formations,
   Montana: Nonmarine responses to the Claggett and
   Bearpaw marine cycles. J. Sedimentary Research,
   68(4):615-631.


Now for you activity nuts, a relevant paper on birds and mammals...

Bishop, C.M. 1997. Heart mass and the maximum cardiac
   Output of birds and mammals: implications for estimating
   The maximum aerobic power input of flying animals.
   Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London, B, 352:447-456.

And now a truly outstanding paper in incredible detail analyzing how tracks are 
made in substrates. Based on subfossil mammals but is of great use to all 
ichno-types.

Allen, J.R.L. 1997. Subfossil mammalian tracks (Flandrian)
   In the Severn Estuary, S.W. Britain: mechanics of
   Formation, preservation, and distribution.
   Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London, B, 352:481-518.

Now a nice paleobotanical review from a friend of mine. We can all use more 
knowledge of what was around for our beasts to eat (at least the herbivores).

Wing, S.L. & L.D. Boucher. 1998. Ecological aspects of the 
   Cretaceous flowering plant radiation. Annual Reviews of
   Earth & Planetary Sciences, 26:379-421.

Some more older stuff (1997) from an issue of Palaeont. Afr. That came in 
relatively recently..

Gow, C. & B. de Klerk. 1997. First record of Eunotosaurus
   (Amniota: Parareptilia) from the Eastern Cape.
   Palaeont. Afri., 34:27-31.

New occurrence of this fat old form which is reviewed in the next one...

Gow, C.E. 1997. A reassessment of  Eunotosaurus
   Africanus Seeley (Amniota: Parareptilia).
   Palaeont. Afri., 34:33-42.

Moving on the Gow bandwagon, we have

Gow, C. & B. S. Rubidge. 1997. The oldest procolophonid
   (Amniota: Parareptilia) - new discovery from the lower
   Beaufort of South Africa.  Palaeont. Afri., 34:49-53.

As it says. And there's more new stuff in a journal to be renamed Gowiana (just 
kidding Chris)....

Gow, C. 1997. A note on the postcranial skeleton of
   Milleretta  (Amniota: Parareptilia). Palaeont. Afri.,
   34:55-57.

Then we have a left femur from a sauropod from the dinosaur-rare beds of the 
Maastrichtian of Egypt. Suggests it show brachiosaurid affinities.

Rauhut, O.W.M. & C. Werner. 1997. First record of
   Maastrichtian sauropod dinosaur from Egypt.
   Palaeont. Afri., 34:63-67.

Then we have..

Reid, R.E.H. 1997. A short history of dinosaur
   Osteocytes. Palaeont. Afri., 34:59-61.

Response to a paper by Fukuda & Obata (1993) stating that they missed a whole 
bunch of earlier stuff and giving a short summary.


A good stopping point.

Ralph Chapman, NMNH