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Re: T. rex



Gustav, DinoGeorge, and Patrick (and the rest of the list):

    If Jack Horner meant that _T. rex_ exhibited the same behaviors as
hyenas are now known to have, I don't think anyone would disagree with him.
But I've talked with Jack and heard and seen some of his comments.  He
doesn't believe that _T. rex_ was an effective hunter - maybe it scared its
prey to death, or as Jack has said more than once, maybe it tripped a
_Triceratops_ and the fall killed it!  He means (or at least consistently
seems to mean) that _T. rex_ did NOT hunt for its food or lie in wait for
it.  The majority of predators ALSO scavenge.

    George - your question, to which Patrick has supplied a list of answers,
would lead one to infer that _T. rex_ out weighed and out-muscled its
nearest predatory competitors by more than 2 to 1.

    Allan Edels

-----Original Message-----
From: Derkits, Gustav E, JR (Gus) <gderkits@lucent.com>
To: dinosaur@usc.edu <dinosaur@usc.edu>; 'derek@url.co.nz' <derek@url.co.nz>
Date: Sunday, March 07, 1999 6:15 PM
Subject: RE: T. rex


> The categorical distinction "predator" vs. "scavenger" doesn't
>appear
>to be a very sharp one, as the discussion of hyenas vs lions shows. There
>is now plenty of footage by Hugo Van Lawick and others showing hyenas
>killing and then being driven away from their kills by lions. Lions also
>steal from Cheetahs. On the other hand, hyenas are known to eat things
>so dead that only the bones are left. Their powerful jaws can crack the
>largest bones and extract the marrow from dessicated carcases. When Dr.
>Horner
>describes T. Rex as a scavenger, "like hyenas", as he has done, it is
>not clear whether he means the complex of behaviors now known as
>part of the hyena repertoire or the old, naive view of hyenas as the
lowlife
>of the the veldt. Eating fresh kills by other animals is still scavenging,
>and killing by lying in wait, taking a bite out of something and then
>letting it die from bloodloss so you can eat it at leisure is still
>predation.