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Re: Biogeography (was Re: Biggest predators)



-----Original Message-----
From: Thomas R. Holtz, Jr. <th81@umail.umd.edu>
To: rayancog@pacific.net.ph <rayancog@pacific.net.ph>
Cc: dinosaur@usc.edu <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Date: 17. marec 1999 14:38
Subject: Biogeography (was Re: Biggest predators)


>>N. America was in turn, connected to
>>Europe (through Greenland?), which itself was connected to Africa (via
>>Gibraltar, the Atlas range?).
>
>EEK!  Don't try and place Late Cenozoic geography on the Cretaceous: a lot
>of what is now southern Europe were still isolated blocks during the latest
>Cretaceous, and only accreted onto the European Cretaceous during the
Cenozoic.
>


Actually, the geography of southern Europe was changing so frequently (in
geological terms of course) during the Cretaceous - emerging and submerging
land-masses - shallow seas - it would be very hard to make even the
approximate map of the area at any given period. However, at certain times
some land bridges that connected Europe and  Africa might have  existed via
Italy, Adriatic, Istria and central Dalmatian islands (the existence of big
brachiosaurids and hadrosaurs in this area speaks against the "isolated
island" theory). The rest of this bridge (if ever existed) is now buried
under the Adriatic and Mediterranean seas.

Berislav Krzic (Kr?ic)
illustrissimus@usa.net
ILLUSTRISSIMUS PRODUCTIONS
http://illustrissimus.virtualave.net/
DINOSAUR ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE
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BERI'S DINOSAUR WORLD
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