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Re: symbiotic relationships among dinosaurs



At 08:49 AM 30/05/1999 -0600, you wrote:
>Gang,
>
>
>     Were there any known symbiotic relationships between any two (or more)
>species of dinosaur, like the zebra and wildebeast of today's Africa?

How on earth would you tell?  Short of something really weird turning up I
cannot imagine what sort of fossil you would need to show such a thing -
much less determine if it were mutually beneficial!

If we can look at modern dinosaurs (sorry, birds), for a moment, there are
certainly mutualistic relationships among some of them (and I think calling
the relationship between zebras and wildebeest "symbiotic" is grossly
overstretching the meaning of that term - they can certainly get along
quite well without each other!).  For example, the rare Saffron-cowled
Blackbird of southern Brazil and northern Argentina is almost always found
in association with a flycatcher, the Black-and-white Monjita; and many
forest birds, particularly in the tropics, regularly associate in mixed
feeding flocks - in the tropics these can be highly organized indeed.  At
least two species of antshrike in Brazil actually use special calls to
round up other species in the flock every morning.
--
Ronald I. Orenstein                           Phone: (905) 820-7886
International Wildlife Coalition              Fax/Modem: (905) 569-0116
1825 Shady Creek Court                 
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 3W2          mailto:ornstn@home.com