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RE: EVIL FANGED CERAPODANS



   "Ghoul" elephants?!  :-)  Would make an outstanding George Romero movie.
But, elephants have very long
digestive tracks, so there must be some nutrient in the carcasses that makes
it worth the risk of having
this stuff in their tracks for a long time?  So, does a carnivore by
definition have a "better" digestive
system?   All three dietary strategies obviously work.
   I think the terms carnivore and herbivore are meant to convey dominant
dietary habits.  Chimps ocassionally eat
termintes, but that hardly makes them omnivores.

Dwight Stewart

> -----Original Message-----
> From: dbensen [SMTP:dbensen@gotnet.net]
> Sent: Friday, November 19, 1999 5:44 PM
> To:   darren.naish@port.ac.uk
> Cc:   dinosaur@usc.edu; NJPharris@aol.com; luisrey@ndirect.co.uk;
> Tetanurae@aol.com; t.naish@mdlmarinas.co.uk
> Subject:      Re: EVIL FANGED CERAPODANS
> 
> >>Incidentally, Asian elephants have
> been known to exhume human carcasses and then eat them. Nice. <<
> 
> Elephants don't have very good digestive systems.  No doubt they wanted to
> pick up
> some extra nutrients from the meat.
> 
> Hey, and aren't lots of 'carnivores' known to eat vegetation for roughage?
> Perhaps
> 'carnivory' and 'herbivory' are merely different gradations of omnivory.
> 
> Dan