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Re: Tetracods [was PALEONEWS:New Species]



>>This point appears to be made from some sort of flint or chert, and is
totally unlike the trowels, throwing knives, and barbecue tongs used by
modern humans in their backyards.<<

Throwing knives?
The kids must be very obedient to a request to 'Sit still!' at your house.
Speaking of everyday immortality, each month I produce a cogent analysis of
some aspect of gambling behavior.  As far as I know, these are never read,
but are filed in heavy metallic locked cabinets.  A million years from now I
expect they will be found and placed on exhibit, where they will be unread
by a larger and more enthusiastic audience.



----- Original Message -----
From: "Matt Wedel" <sauropod@ou.edu>
To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Cc: <sauropod@ou.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2000 2:15 AM
Subject: Tetracods [was PALEONEWS:New Species]


> > "We've had fossils with very advanced fishes. We've had fossils with
> > very primitive land animals called tetrapods. But there had been a gap
> > in the middle until now. This is where the new fossil fits in."
>
> Well, finally!
>
> In keeping with the general trend in recent news releases (first
> herbivorous dinosaur nests, first fish-tetrapod intermediary), I'd like
> to announce that I've discovered the first evidence of prehistoric man.
> This evidence came in the form of a crude stone point I discovered in my
> backyard.  This point appears to be made from some sort of flint or
> chert, and is totally unlike the trowels, throwing knives, and barbecue
> tongs used by modern humans in their backyards. I therefore propose that
> at some time in the distant past, perhaps even before my housing edition
> was constructed, primitive humans roamed the suburbs and used their
> simple, handmade tools for gardening, barbecuing, and other backyard
> activities.
>
> I also propose that henceforth all animals more advanced than
> Eusthenopteron and more primitive than Ichthyostega be colloquially
> referred to as 'tetracods.'  I realize that Tetracoda is a paraphyletic
> assemblage, but it should prove useful in informal discussion, much like
> the paraphyletic Class Reptilia of Linnean days. I'll consider the
> dino-list my journal and you all my reviewers. Please disseminate the
> term as widely as possible.
>
> And since I just came up with that myself, I'm gonna be lit if anyone
> else thought of it first. ;-)
>
> Matt Wedel
>