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Re: Bambiraptor feinbergi



>> "This species is truly a dinosaur Rosetta stone," said Martin Shugar, the
institute's director, referring to the tablet found 200 years ago that
helped archaeologists decipher Egyptian hieroglyphics...
 John Ostrum, a Yale University professor and one of the world's leading
paleontologists, examined the skeleton and likened it to the Mona Lisa.<<

I wish there were an ICZN for comparisons!
The Rosetta Stone had the same text in three different languages, one of
them hieroglyphics.
The Mona Lisa is a conventional portrait except for the expression, which is
a friendly, inveighling mystery.
So, this little dino would clarify if we understood.
Maybe the comparisons aren't so bad after all!

 from The Creeper (1948)

Good scientist: You may be right, Jim. Logically right. But morally in my
catalogue of values man comes first. Without man, there wouldn't even be a
science!
Evil scientist: The trouble with you is, you're not a scientist! You're a
philosopher. In our world, there's no room for philosophers!
Good scientist: That's precisely what's wrong. There's no place for the
philosopher - the man whose sole function it is, just to think. How
wonderful to have nothing to do but - just to think.!

Male scientist: [Introducing his lab mice] Come over here and meet my
favourite characters! See the fat one? That's Gertrude. She's a wonderful
mother. That skinny one's Ophelia. She has a suicide complex, poor thing.
That chap who's looking at you so brazenly, he's a regular old rip! See the
plump one? That's Sandra. She's a cute little--- [He is interrupted by the
sound of breaking glass] Where'd she go?
Female scientist: It's nothing, John.
Male scientist: What do you mean, nothing? People don't just drop glasses
and run out of offices! Or maybe it's me. Do you think I have five o'clock
shadow?



----- Original Message -----
From: "Loren Coleman" <lcolema1@maine.rr.com>
To: <dinosaur@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2000 6:01 PM
Subject: Bambiraptor feinbergi


> Any new developments re: the following?
> Thank you,
> - Loren Coleman
> http://www.lorencoleman.com
> ------
> Mar 18, 2000 - 05:28 AM
>
> Scientists Unveil Bird-Like Dinosaur Skeleton: Bambiraptor
> By Terry Spencer
> Associated Press Writer
>
>
> DANIA BEACH, Fla. (AP) - Researchers have unveiled what may be the most
> convincing evolutionary link yet between dinosaurs and birds: a 75
> million-year-old creature with a roadrunner's body, arms that resembled
> clawed wings and hair-like feathers.
>
> They call it Bambiraptor feinbergi.
>
> The first recovered skeleton of the species was shown Thursday by the
> Florida Institute of Paleontology. It is not clear whether the creature
> could fly, but experts said that anatomically it is the most bird-like
> dinosaur yet discovered. They said the finding advances the increasingly
> popular theory that birds evolved from dinosaurs.
>
> Bambiraptor's skeleton was discovered in 1994 by 14-year-old Wes Linster,
> who was hunting for fossils near Glacier National Park in northern
Montana.
>
> More than 95 percent of the warm-blooded carnivore's bones were recovered.
> Scientists are usually ecstatic to recover 30 percent of a dinosaur's
> skeleton.
>
> "This species is truly a dinosaur Rosetta stone," said Martin Shugar, the
> institute's director, referring to the tablet found 200 years ago that
> helped archaeologists decipher Egyptian hieroglyphics.
>
> The skeleton will be exhibited at the Graves Museum of Archaeology &
Natural
> History, where the institute is based. Shugar persuaded Michael Feinberg,
a
> Hollywood, Fla., investor and philanthropist, to buy the specimen for an
> undisclosed price and lend it to the museum.
>
> Linster christened the specimen bambiraptor because it's small like Bambi.
> The feinbergi was added later to honor Feinberg.
> John Ostrum, a Yale University professor and one of the world's leading
> paleontologists, examined the skeleton and likened it to the Mona Lisa. "I
> have never seen any specimen as complete as that and I have collected all
> over the world," he said.
>
> Ostrum said bambiraptor has several traits usually found in birds, such as
a
> wishbone instead of a full breastbone and avian-like arm bones.
>
> About 3 feet long and weighing 7 pounds, bambiraptor lived in a sparsely
> forested area in what is now Montana at a time when the Rocky Mountains
were
> just beginning to rise, said David A. Burnham, a University of Kansas
> paleontologist who assembled the skeleton.
>
> It would have preyed on small mammals and reptiles, using its teeth, sharp
> talons and whip-like 18-inch tail to subdue its prey, said Burnham and
Kraig
> Dertsler, a University of New Orleans professor who helped study it.
>
> It was fast, had a keen sense of smell and the structure of its arms and
its
> feathers may have allowed it to fly, although more study must be done
before
> that can be concluded, Burnham and Dertsler said.
> ---
> On the Net: Fossilwork Laboratories: http://www.bambiraptor.com
>