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Mammal/Reptile NECK VERTS




Two questions:
(1) Where in the synapsid lineage is the transition from a primitive 6 cervicals to the 7 found in mammals. Perhaps in the therapsids?
(2) Do all non-archosauromorph reptiles have the primitive 6 cervicals, and in particular, how many cervicals are found in turtles?
--------Ken
********************************************************
From: darren.naish@port.ac.uk
Reply-To: darren.naish@port.ac.uk
To: dinosaur@usc.edu
Subject: MAMMAL NECK VERTS
Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 14:46:07 +0100

Matt Bonnan wrote...

> All mammals have only 7 cervical vertebrae

_Giraffa_ has 8 - some sloths and sirenians have anything between 5
and 9! However, these are like four exceptions out of at least 5000
species (that's the 4500-odd extant mammals plus some of the better
known fossil ones).

Regarding neck mobility in non-diplodocoid sauropods, Kent Stevens
presented new work on _Brachiosaurus_ and a long-necked
euhelopodid (can't remember which genus - probably _Euhelopus_) at
the SVPCA meeting in Edinburgh last year. I briefly wrote this up for
DML so it's in the archives somewhere. I don't know how long it is
before this sees publication. As well as Jeff Wilson's objections
mentioned at SVP in Denver, Paul Upchurch had a www
communication to _Science_ about the Parrish and Stevens' study.

DARREN NAISH
PALAEOBIOLOGY RESEARCH GROUP
School of Earth, Environmental & Physical Sciences
UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH
Burnaby Building
Burnaby Road                           email: darren.naish@port.ac.uk
Portsmouth UK                          tel: 01703 446718
P01 3Q
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