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Re: AZHDARCHID NECKS



the LINE drawings in question (NOT the painting) show 2 views of Q
(scavenging like a vulture on a large carcass and as an active
predator)- to illustrate the conflicting theories of lifestyle. The line
drawings don't illustrate such an exclusive marine existance as you take
umbrage against.

JimC tells me Q's neck was probably pretty stiff.

-Betty

darren.naish@port.ac.uk wrote:
> 
> On the necks of azhdarchid pterosaurs, Jaime wrote...
> > Sibbick's painting is hypothetical, rather than based
> > on fact. I guess storks and other long-necked birds
> > were the basis of the restoration, but that's a guess.
<snip>
> Perhaps Jim C could throw in a few comments here.
> 
> The idea in the Sibbick painting is (Frey and Martill's) that these
> pterosaurs were slow marine gliders that used ground effect, oriented
> the neck so it was ventral to the most downward excursion of the
> wingtip, and caught fish by grabbing from the water surface. The neck
> is held pretty straight, cranial crests wouldn't be a good idea because
> wind blowing in from the side would place a lot of torque on the neck,
> and a very mobile thoracic-cervical transition point is a necessity. To
> break the water surface with the minimum of resistance the animal also
> has to have very blade-like distal jaws: hence the beak shape in the
> _Arambourgiania_ model. I have a big problem with this in that I think
> contact with the water surface for a flying animal of this size would
> disrupt the glide, even at slow speed. This is something we spend a lot
> of time arguing about.


-- 
Flying Goat Graphics
http://www.flyinggoat.com
(Society of Vertebrate Paleontology member)
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