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Swimming Dinosaurs



Do any known dinosaurs show any ability for swimming? Not as a single
mode of locomotion, but rather, as a backup, or half-mode, like
crocodiles and hippos, which swim half the time, but are otherwise
land-based, or elephants, horses, etc, which can swim, when given the
opportunity, but are dominantly land-based.

I've read two possible swimmers, hadrosaurs in general, and Suchomimus,
presumably including other spinosaurids as well, had stiffened tails for
balance. Would this allow or prohibit tail-strokes, like that of a
crocodile, or could they have relied on limb-motions?

And while sauropods as purely aquatics has been discounted, could they
swim? I remember one picture in a book of mine when I was younger, a
pack of small allosaurids chasing an apatosaurus, and catching it, in
the water, where it thinks they might not be able to follow, but turn
out to be completely able to. Would this scene be possible?

Could theropods swim? While I know smaller feathered creatures, such as
dromies, oviraptorids, etc might not be able to because of the feathers,
but could their larger cousins, tyrannosaurs, carcharodontosaurines,
carnosaurs in general, be able to swim?

Later ceratopsians, ankylosaurs, and stegosaurs may not have been able
to swim, due to the large bony structures that would have limited
movement and weighed them down, but could, say, a protoceratops,
hypsilophodont, or other smaller, or more primitive ornithischians,
swim?

Thank you for your assistance and patience,
--
Leonidus
alex@voyager.net