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SWIMMING & NEW REFS



Tom Holtz wrote...

> I don't know of many amniotes that CAN'T swim to
> some degree, if necessary.  Can anyone think of some?

The books say that camels can't swim. I really don't know if this is true. 
Some humans can't swim:) Swifts and hummingbirds can't swim 
AFAIK.

While I'm here, the following refs just in...

Christiansen, P. 2000. Feeding mechanisms of the sauropod dinosaurs 
_Brachiosaurus_, _Camarasaurus_, _Diplodocus_ and 
_Dicraeosaurus_. _Historical Biology_ 14: 137-152.

Incidentally, the last issue of HB was a special volume on aquatic 
tetrapods (papers presented at the 2nd Symposium on Secondary 
Adaptation to Life in Water): includes Taylor on bone ballast (not 
'ballastin' as it says in the title), Fernandez on Argentinian 
ophthalmosaurian ichthyosaurs, Paramo-Fonseca on the mosasaur 
_Yaguarasaurus_, and loads of stuff on cetaceans, pinnipeds, 
desmostylians, sirenians and turtles. Speaking of turtles... has anyone 
seen the photos of the new Vietnamese softshells? My god they're big.

The current ish of HB also has - - 

Naples, V.L. and Martin, L.D. 2000. Evolution of hystricomorphy in 
the Nimravidae (Carnivora; Barbourofelinae): evidence for complex 
character convergence with rodents. _Historical Biology_ 14: 169-
188.

!!!!!!!!! Look fwd to reading it.

Woolley, J.D. 2000. The functional morphology of the avian flight 
muscle m. coracobrachialis posterior. _The Journal of Experimental 
Biology_ 203: 1767-1776.

Like many other papers on avian wing morphology, puts the structures 
in their appropriate historical framework. Also some really interesting 
perspectives on muscle isometry and neural modulation as provided by 
case studies on turkeys, wallabies and cockroaches (!)

Farmer, C.G. and Carrier, D.R. 2000. Pelvic aspiration in the 
American alligator (_Alligator mississipiensis_). _The Journal of 
Experimental Biology_ 203: 1679-1687.

As above, puts alligator lung ventilaton and diaphragm function in 
historical context and should be read alongside Carrier and Farmer 
(2000 - _Paleobiology_ 26: 271-293, discussed previously on DML 
by Tom Holtz). Carrier and Farmer cite an _American Zoologist_ 
article on this subject that's in press. There was a paper in the same ish 
on alligator respiration, unfortunately I seem to have left it at home.

Have just been looking at slides of a Brazilian millipede mass 
migration. Seems to be unreported in the literature so we might write it 
up.

DARREN NAISH 
PALAEOBIOLOGY RESEARCH GROUP
School of Earth, Environmental & Physical Sciences
UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH
Burnaby Building
Burnaby Road                           email: darren.naish@port.ac.uk
Portsmouth UK                          tel: 01703 446718
P01 3QL