[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Sue on CNN



There are a number of transcripts of the CNN programming
which covered Sue's debut on Wednesday.  Some excerpts:

http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0005/17/tod.10.html
> CNN Today
> T. Rex Debuts in Chicago Museum
> Aired May 17, 2000 - 2:53 p.m. ET 
> THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN 
> ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
> JEFF FLOCK, CNN CORRESPONDENT: <SNIP> 
> One of the people -- the key people responsible, a 
> large team put this together. But the man who
> actually built it is the guy that I am with right
> now, Phil Fraley. 
> FLOCK: <SNIP>
> that are almost a foot long, some of them. What is 
> your reaction just as a human being? 
> FRALEY: Fear. I would be afraid to have this animal
> in close proximity. It could actually run at 35 
> miles per hour based on scientific evidence, so if we
> were this close to it we would literally not have 
> the chance of getting away from it. So, it is fairly 
> frightening. 

and
http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0005/17/tod.03.html
>CNN Today
> Rieppel: Fossil Skull Offers Different Insights into 
> T. rex
> Aired May 17, 2000 - 1:24 p.m. ET 
> THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN 
> ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
> And CNN's Jeff Flock is at the Field Museum of
> natural history, where Sue is making his debut --
>  Jeff. 
> JEFF FLOCK, CNN CORRESPONDENT: <SNIP>
> What makes it so amazing, as I'm joined by Olivier 
> Rieppel, who has been in some sense supervising,
> looking over this majestic project for the past two
> years here at the Field Museum. One of the things
> that makes this so extraordinary is the completeness
> of it, yes? 
> OLIVIER RIEPPEL, GEOLOGY CURATOR: That's correct, 
> it's the most complete T. rex that we know and also 
> the biggest one. And for scientific purposes, the 
> completeness is the most important aspect of the
> specimen. 
<SNIP>
> RIEPPEL: Well, what you see here is a bunch of holes
> that are difficult to interpret if you're not an 
> expert. There is an eye socket and there is two holes 
> in the -- behind the eye for the muscle attachment.
> Then there is what is called an antorbital penithra
> (ph) hole in front of that, and then the external 
> mares (ph). What is important is: bony structures 
> inside this snout. for example, there is a lamina 
> (ph) of bone which some people thought could indicate
>  whether T. rex is a homeo -- is a -- produces his 
> own body heat or whether it is like a lizard, 
> FLOCK: Warm-blooded, cold-blooded. 
> RIEPPEL: Warm-blooded, cold-blooded, exactly. 
> FLOCK: Do you know? 
> RIEPPEL: No, we don't know for sure. We know that
> what we had thought could be turpidence (ph) are not
> in this particular specimen. We don't think T. rex 
> has turpidence, that's something which we learned 
> through CT scanning. But whether that rules out warm-
> bloodedness, we can't tell. 
<SNIP>

Mary
mkirkaldy@aol.com