[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: Kenyan Dino info sought




Tracy Ford wrote:

> Alls I have is this
>
> Spinosaurus sp
>
> JACOBS, WINKLER & GOMNI, 1996/WEISHAMPEL, 1990, WESCOTT et al, 1993
>
> Number:
>
> Locality: Rift Valley Province, Kenya.
>
> Horizon: Turkana Grits, Turonian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous.
>
> Material:
>
> Jacobs, Louis L., Dale A. Winkler and Elizabeth M. Gomani, 1996. Cretaceous
> Dinosaurs of Africa: examples from Cameroon and Malawi. Proceedings of the
> Gondwana Dinosaur Symposium, Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, Volume 39,
> Part 3: 595-610.
> I'd be interested what others have.
> Tracy

Well, for this weeks research I found.....the Jacobs,Winkler,Gomani paper seems
to have no Kenya data itself, but has a reference to the 1969 Arambourg, Wolff
paper and Westcott et al 1993. Neither of which contains the word Spinosaurus,
so where does the Spinosaurus information originate I wonder? The Westcott et
al 1993 paper contains interesting geological data, where they argue that the
Turkana Grits in that area are Oligo-Miocene deposits rather than Cretaceous.
Westcott et al 1993 propose no explanation for the previously recovered
Dinosaur fossil/s. They refer back to Arambourg and Wolff 1969, and that they
consider the  host deposit for the Dinosaur fragment is an exceptional
occurence.

So far, lots of the usual circulating but nothing new....However, they also
refer to this:      Williamson, P.G and Savage, R.J.C. 1986 Early rift
sedimentation in the Turkana Basin, Northern Kenya. In: Sedimentation in the
African Rifts, Geol.Soc.,London, Spec.Pub.25, 267-283. Perhaps something to be
found there next week....

The paper that would stand out is the Harris and Russell Preliminary Notes on
the occurrence of Dinosaurs in the Turkan Grits of Northern Kenya ?Date, but I
fear it was never completed and published. Does anyone know if this was ever
published somewhere, and the origin of the Spinosaurus reference for Kenya?

cheers,
Mark Thompson

"The grass is always greener on the other side,
but did you see how much fertiliser they use?"