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RE: Dinosaur Genera List corrections #165



Spoiler space
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Okay: as a personal plea to every single one of you I may have helped in the 
past, on-line or off, PLEASE cease and desist any discussion of this book.

On Monday July 9th we can pick this up.  I will give a detailed accounting of 
why then.

PLEASE, do not talk about any of this.  

                Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
                Vertebrate Paleontologist
Department of Geology           Director, Earth, Life & Time Program
University of Maryland          College Park Scholars
                College Park, MD  20742       
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/tholtz.htm
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~jmerck/eltsite
Phone:  301-405-4084    Email:  tholtz@geol.umd.edu
Fax (Geol):  301-314-9661       Fax (CPS-ELT): 301-405-0796


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dinogeorge@aol.com [mailto:Dinogeorge@aol.com]
> Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2001 5:06 PM
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Dinosaur Genera List corrections #165
> 
> 
> Here is a tidal wave of four new dinosaurs, part of that dinosaur-genera 
> flood that I mentioned in a previous DGL corrections, all 
> resulting from a 
> single book that was released just last week:
> 
> Tanke, Darren H. & Carpenter, Kenneth, eds., 2001. Mesozoic 
> Vertebrate Life: 
> New Research inspired by the Paleontology of Philip J. Currie, Indiana 
> University Press, Bloomington & Indianapolis, Indiana: xviii + 542 pp.
> 
> This is a "must have" book for all dinosaur aficionados. It can now be 
> ordered through Amazon or from Indiana University Press. Its existence is 
> being kept secret from Phil Currie, but the surprise may already 
> be blown by 
> the book's listing at the Amazon and Indiana University Press websites. 
> Nevertheless, I've removed Phil's email addresses from my address 
> list for 
> this post, so if he hears of this book before receiving his 
> surprise copy in 
> Alberta next week, it won't be from me (heh heh); as far as I 
> know, Phil is 
> not on the dinosaur list.
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Dinosaur genus #909 comes from the following article in the book:
> 
> Coria, Rodolfo A., 2001. "New Theropod from the Late Cretaceous of 
> Patagonia," article 1 of Tanke & Carpenter, eds., 2001: 3-9.
> 
> Quilmesaurus Coria, 2001
> 
> And we add the following entry to the South American dinosaurs 
> list in the 
> forthcoming Mesozoic Meanderings #3 second printing:
> 
> Quilmesaurus Coria, 2001
>     Q. curriei Coria, 2001â
> 
> This is a medium-size theropod of uncertain affinities from the Allen 
> Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian) of Argentina, known mainly from 
> distinctive hind limb material.
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Dinosaur genus #910 is described in the following article:
> 
> Tidwell, Virginia, Carpenter, Kenneth & Meyer, Susanne, 2001. "New 
> Titanosauriform (Sauropoda) from the Poison Strip Member of the Cedar 
> Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Utah," article 11 of Tanke & 
> Carpenter, eds., 2001: 139-165.
> 
> Venenosaurus Tidwell, Carpenter & Meyer, 2001
> 
> And we add the following entry to the North American dinosaurs 
> list in the 
> forthcoming Mesozoic meanderings #3 second printing:
> 
> Venenosaurus Tidwell, Carpenter & Meyer, 2001
>     V. dicrocei Tidwell, Carpenter & Meyer, 2001â
> 
> This is a smallish titanosauriform of uncertain affinities, 
> perhaps a derived 
> brachiosaurid, based on a partial skeleton including mainly limb 
> elements and 
> distinctive caudal vertebrae. A juvenile of this genus may also 
> be known, but 
> is not described in this article.
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Dinosaur genus #911 is described in:
> 
> DiCroce, Tony & Carpenter, Kenneth, 2001. "New Ornithopod from the Cedar 
> Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of Eastern Utah," article 
> 13 of Tanke & 
> Carpenter, eds., 2001: 183-196.
> 
> Planicoxa DiCroce & Carpenter, 2001
> 
> And add the following to the list of North American dinosaurs in 
> MM #3 second 
> printing:
> 
> Planicoxa DiCroce & Carpenter, 2001
>     P. venenica DiCroce & Carpenter, 2001â
> 
> This is a medium-size ?iguanodontid based on a type ilium and numerous 
> referred specimens (girdle and limb elements and vertebrae) found in 
> association in a single quarry ("Tony's Bone Bed").
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Dinosaur genus #912 is described in:
> 
> Dong Zhiming, 2001. "Primitive Armored Dinosaur from the Lufeng Basin, 
> China," article 17 of Tanke & Carpenter, eds., 2001: 237-242.
> 
> Bienosaurus Dong, 2001
> 
> And add the following to the list of Asiatic dinosaurs in MM #3 second 
> printing:
> 
> Bienosaurus Dong, 2001
>     B. lufengensis Dong, 2001â
> 
> Based mainly on a right lower jaw with teeth, this genus is classified in 
> Scelidosauridae, and the family Scelidosauridae is removed from "basal 
> Thyreophora" and referred to the taxon Ankylosauria (i.e., along with 
> Nodosauridae, Ankylosauridae, and Polacanthidae). It is from the Dark Red 
> Beds of the Lower Lufeng Formation.
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> There is some theropod taxonomy concerning Laelaps trihedrodon in the 
> following article:
> 
> Chure, Dan, 2001. "On the Type and Referred Material of Laelaps 
> trihedrodon 
> Cope 1877 (Dinosauria: Theropoda)," article 2 of Tanke & Carpenter, eds., 
> 2001: 10-18.
> 
> Dan notes that the species was referred to the genus Hypsirophus as H. 
> trihedrodon in unpublished work by Cope, and to the genus 
> Creosaurus as C. 
> trigonodon [sic] by Osborn in 1931. Both of these referrals will 
> be added to 
> the entry for Dryptosaurus trihedrodon in MM #3 second printing. 
> Dan supports 
> referral of this species to the genus Allosaurus as a nomen 
> dubium but stops 
> short of synonymizing it with Allosaurus fragilis.
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> In the article
> 
> Molnar, Ralph E., 2001. "Theropod Paleopathology: A Literature Survey," 
> article 24 of Tanke & Carpenter, eds., 2001: 337-363.
> 
> Molnar uses the family name Acrocanthosauridae for the genera 
> Acrocanthosaurus
>  and Carcharodontosaurus. This is the first use of this name as 
> far as I know.
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> The volume also includes two new footprint species:
> 
> Aquatilavipes curriei ichnosp. nov. (a bird track)
> 
> Tricorynopus brinkmani ichnosp. nov. (a mammal track)
> 
> which I list here mainly for completeness; I don't track (heh 
> heh) ichnotaxa 
> in my lists (yet), and neither is a nonavian dinosaur track anyway.
> 
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Finally, I have asterisked the genus Patricosaurus in the 
> dinosaur list (and 
> also in MM #3 second printing) because a recent email by Mickey Mortimer 
> fails to find any clear dinosaurian characteristics in the Patricosaurus 
> material as described. Darren Naish notes in a separate email that a 
> redescription of the material is in progress by British paleontologists.
>